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Wolbachia: master manipulators of invertebrate biology

Wolbachia: master manipulators of invertebrate biology This Review focuses on intracellular Wolbachia, which are globally widespread Rickettsia-like bacteria that infect many arthropod species, as well as filarial nematodes. The authors discuss recent advances in Wolbachia research, with an emphasis on genetics and genomics, ecology, evolution and applications to pest and disease control. Wolbachia are primarily reproductive parasites that have several different effects on hosts, including feminization, induced parthenogenesis, male killing and a sperm–egg incompatibility that is known as cytoplasmic incompatibility. Wolbachia can effectively manipulate the biology of host cells, and have evolved mutualisms with their hosts. These and other effects of Wolbachia are discussed, as well as recent advances on the understanding of cytological interactions between bacteria and their host. Maintenance of the global Wolbachia pandemic is discussed, including factors that affect the spread of Wolbachia, transfer between host species and persistence within a host lineage. The usefulness of multilocus strain typing to characterize the movement and diversity of these bacteria is also emphasized. The evolutionary implications of Wolbachia infection are discussed, including the possible role of this endosymbiont in the promotion of reproductive isolation and speciation, as well as its potential to contribute to host genome evolution through horizontal transfer of genes from the bacteria into their host. Finally, the authors outline possible practical applications of Wolbachia in pest and disease vector management strategies and highlight the main unanswered questions regarding Wolbachia biology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Microbiology Springer Journals

Wolbachia: master manipulators of invertebrate biology

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References (109)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Life Sciences; Life Sciences, general; Microbiology; Medical Microbiology; Parasitology; Infectious Diseases; Virology
ISSN
1740-1526
eISSN
1740-1534
DOI
10.1038/nrmicro1969
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This Review focuses on intracellular Wolbachia, which are globally widespread Rickettsia-like bacteria that infect many arthropod species, as well as filarial nematodes. The authors discuss recent advances in Wolbachia research, with an emphasis on genetics and genomics, ecology, evolution and applications to pest and disease control. Wolbachia are primarily reproductive parasites that have several different effects on hosts, including feminization, induced parthenogenesis, male killing and a sperm–egg incompatibility that is known as cytoplasmic incompatibility. Wolbachia can effectively manipulate the biology of host cells, and have evolved mutualisms with their hosts. These and other effects of Wolbachia are discussed, as well as recent advances on the understanding of cytological interactions between bacteria and their host. Maintenance of the global Wolbachia pandemic is discussed, including factors that affect the spread of Wolbachia, transfer between host species and persistence within a host lineage. The usefulness of multilocus strain typing to characterize the movement and diversity of these bacteria is also emphasized. The evolutionary implications of Wolbachia infection are discussed, including the possible role of this endosymbiont in the promotion of reproductive isolation and speciation, as well as its potential to contribute to host genome evolution through horizontal transfer of genes from the bacteria into their host. Finally, the authors outline possible practical applications of Wolbachia in pest and disease vector management strategies and highlight the main unanswered questions regarding Wolbachia biology.

Journal

Nature Reviews MicrobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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