Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

60,000 Disaster Victims Speak: Part I. An Empirical Review of the Empirical Literature, 1981—2001

60,000 Disaster Victims Speak: Part I. An Empirical Review of the Empirical Literature, 1981—2001 AbstractResults for 160 samples of disaster victims were coded as to sample type, disaster type, disaster location, outcomes and risk factors observed, and overall severity of impairment. In order of frequency, outcomes included specific psychological problems, nonspecific distress, health problems, chronic problems in living, resource loss, and problems specific to youth. Regression analyses showed that samples were more likely to be impaired if they were composed of youth rather than adults, were from developing rather than developed countries, or experienced mass violence (e.g., terrorism, shooting sprees) rather than natural or technological disasters. Most samples of rescue and recovery workers showed remarkable resilience. Within adult samples, more severe exposure, female gender, middle age, ethnic minority status, secondary stressors, prior psychiatric problems, and weak or deteriorating psychosocial resources most consistently increased the likelihood of adverse outcomes. Among youth, family factors were primary. Implications of the research for clinical practice and community intervention are discussed in a companion article (Norris, Friedman, and Watson, this volume). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes Taylor & Francis

60,000 Disaster Victims Speak: Part I. An Empirical Review of the Empirical Literature, 1981—2001

33 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/60-000-disaster-victims-speak-part-i-an-empirical-review-of-the-ReaVzU2efc

References (8)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© Guilford Publications Inc.
ISSN
1943-281X
eISSN
0033-2747
DOI
10.1521/psyc.65.3.207.20173
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractResults for 160 samples of disaster victims were coded as to sample type, disaster type, disaster location, outcomes and risk factors observed, and overall severity of impairment. In order of frequency, outcomes included specific psychological problems, nonspecific distress, health problems, chronic problems in living, resource loss, and problems specific to youth. Regression analyses showed that samples were more likely to be impaired if they were composed of youth rather than adults, were from developing rather than developed countries, or experienced mass violence (e.g., terrorism, shooting sprees) rather than natural or technological disasters. Most samples of rescue and recovery workers showed remarkable resilience. Within adult samples, more severe exposure, female gender, middle age, ethnic minority status, secondary stressors, prior psychiatric problems, and weak or deteriorating psychosocial resources most consistently increased the likelihood of adverse outcomes. Among youth, family factors were primary. Implications of the research for clinical practice and community intervention are discussed in a companion article (Norris, Friedman, and Watson, this volume).

Journal

Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological ProcessesTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.