Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Baroque Landscape of Earth, Water and Fire: The Production of Space at Skokloster, a Swedish Estate of the Seventeenth Century

A Baroque Landscape of Earth, Water and Fire: The Production of Space at Skokloster, a Swedish... AbstractThis article uses the elemental concepts of earth, water and fire to examine the production, use and control of space in the seventeenth-century Wrangel estate at Skokloster in central Sweden. Using a relational approach, the paper discusses how the elements symbolically express a part of the baroque aesthetic, how they were emphasised or pinned down as part of an economic asset, and how they reacted and produced space in dialogue with human agents. The reciprocal relations between man and earth through food production, tenancy and rent, or the management of woodland for firewood, demonstrate an on-going interaction between various socially-hierarchical agents. The construction of dams and the control of water illustrate other struggles between the tenants, the proprietor and the water itself. When setting up new types of heating systems inside the castle multiple sources of agency are visualised – the owners, the domestic servants, the woodland and the fireplaces. The study concludes that the elements operated as more than aesthetic and philosophical categories, but were empirically-evident worldly driving-forces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscapes Taylor & Francis

A Baroque Landscape of Earth, Water and Fire: The Production of Space at Skokloster, a Swedish Estate of the Seventeenth Century

Landscapes , Volume 16 (2): 19 – Nov 1, 2015

A Baroque Landscape of Earth, Water and Fire: The Production of Space at Skokloster, a Swedish Estate of the Seventeenth Century

Landscapes , Volume 16 (2): 19 – Nov 1, 2015

Abstract

AbstractThis article uses the elemental concepts of earth, water and fire to examine the production, use and control of space in the seventeenth-century Wrangel estate at Skokloster in central Sweden. Using a relational approach, the paper discusses how the elements symbolically express a part of the baroque aesthetic, how they were emphasised or pinned down as part of an economic asset, and how they reacted and produced space in dialogue with human agents. The reciprocal relations between man and earth through food production, tenancy and rent, or the management of woodland for firewood, demonstrate an on-going interaction between various socially-hierarchical agents. The construction of dams and the control of water illustrate other struggles between the tenants, the proprietor and the water itself. When setting up new types of heating systems inside the castle multiple sources of agency are visualised – the owners, the domestic servants, the woodland and the fireplaces. The study concludes that the elements operated as more than aesthetic and philosophical categories, but were empirically-evident worldly driving-forces.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/a-baroque-landscape-of-earth-water-and-fire-the-production-of-space-at-3WDK19F961

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2015
ISSN
2040-8153
eISSN
1466-2035
DOI
10.1179/1466203515Z.00000000046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article uses the elemental concepts of earth, water and fire to examine the production, use and control of space in the seventeenth-century Wrangel estate at Skokloster in central Sweden. Using a relational approach, the paper discusses how the elements symbolically express a part of the baroque aesthetic, how they were emphasised or pinned down as part of an economic asset, and how they reacted and produced space in dialogue with human agents. The reciprocal relations between man and earth through food production, tenancy and rent, or the management of woodland for firewood, demonstrate an on-going interaction between various socially-hierarchical agents. The construction of dams and the control of water illustrate other struggles between the tenants, the proprietor and the water itself. When setting up new types of heating systems inside the castle multiple sources of agency are visualised – the owners, the domestic servants, the woodland and the fireplaces. The study concludes that the elements operated as more than aesthetic and philosophical categories, but were empirically-evident worldly driving-forces.

Journal

LandscapesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2015

Keywords: seventeenth century; space; agency; Sweden; Skokloster Estate

References