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A code in the node: The use of a story schema in retrieval*

A code in the node: The use of a story schema in retrieval* Some characteristics of story schemata and their role in encoding and retrieval of stories are briefly described. Story schemata are described in terms of the story grammar outlined in Mandler and Johnson (1977). Using the rules of the grammar, canonical two‐episode stories were generated as well as versions whose surface structure violated the posited underlying structure by interleaving the events of the two episodes. Predictions were made concerning the quantity, quality, and temporal sequencing of recall for the standard and interleaved versions. Recall by second‐, fourth‐, sixth‐grade, and adult subjects was studied. Quantity of recall was less for the interleaved stories but more marked differences were found in the quality of recall; many more distortions and repetitions occurred in recall of interleaved stories. The most pronounced effects were found in sequencing of recall. Subjects hearing interleaved stories showed a strong tendency to recall stories in their canonical form rather than in the correct input order. This tendency was more pronounced for children. It was suggested that children are more dependent on familiar schemata for retrieval than are adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Discourse Processes Taylor & Francis

A code in the node: The use of a story schema in retrieval*

Discourse Processes , Volume 1 (1): 22 – Jan 1, 1978

A code in the node: The use of a story schema in retrieval*

Discourse Processes , Volume 1 (1): 22 – Jan 1, 1978

Abstract

Some characteristics of story schemata and their role in encoding and retrieval of stories are briefly described. Story schemata are described in terms of the story grammar outlined in Mandler and Johnson (1977). Using the rules of the grammar, canonical two‐episode stories were generated as well as versions whose surface structure violated the posited underlying structure by interleaving the events of the two episodes. Predictions were made concerning the quantity, quality, and temporal sequencing of recall for the standard and interleaved versions. Recall by second‐, fourth‐, sixth‐grade, and adult subjects was studied. Quantity of recall was less for the interleaved stories but more marked differences were found in the quality of recall; many more distortions and repetitions occurred in recall of interleaved stories. The most pronounced effects were found in sequencing of recall. Subjects hearing interleaved stories showed a strong tendency to recall stories in their canonical form rather than in the correct input order. This tendency was more pronounced for children. It was suggested that children are more dependent on familiar schemata for retrieval than are adults.

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References (14)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-6950
eISSN
0163-853X
DOI
10.1080/01638537809544426
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Some characteristics of story schemata and their role in encoding and retrieval of stories are briefly described. Story schemata are described in terms of the story grammar outlined in Mandler and Johnson (1977). Using the rules of the grammar, canonical two‐episode stories were generated as well as versions whose surface structure violated the posited underlying structure by interleaving the events of the two episodes. Predictions were made concerning the quantity, quality, and temporal sequencing of recall for the standard and interleaved versions. Recall by second‐, fourth‐, sixth‐grade, and adult subjects was studied. Quantity of recall was less for the interleaved stories but more marked differences were found in the quality of recall; many more distortions and repetitions occurred in recall of interleaved stories. The most pronounced effects were found in sequencing of recall. Subjects hearing interleaved stories showed a strong tendency to recall stories in their canonical form rather than in the correct input order. This tendency was more pronounced for children. It was suggested that children are more dependent on familiar schemata for retrieval than are adults.

Journal

Discourse ProcessesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1978

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