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A-optimal versus D-optimal design of screening experiments

A-optimal versus D-optimal design of screening experiments Abstract The purpose of this article is to persuade experimenters to choose A-optimal designs rather than D-optimal designs for screening experiments. The primary reason for this advice is that the A-optimality criterion is more consistent with the screening objective than the D-optimality criterion. The goal of screening experiments is to identify an active subset of the factors. An A-optimal design minimizes the average variance of the parameter estimates, which is directly related to that goal. While there are many cases where A- and D-optimal designs coincide, the A-optimal designs tend to have better statistical properties when the A- and D-optimal designs differ. In such cases, A-optimal designs generally have more uncorrelated columns in their model matrices than D-optimal designs. Also, even though A-optimal designs minimize the average variance of the parameter estimates, various cases exist where they outperform D-optimal designs in terms of the variances of all individual parameter estimates. Finally, A-optimal designs can also substantially reduce the worst prediction variance compared with D-optimal designs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Quality Technology Taylor & Francis

A-optimal versus D-optimal design of screening experiments

A-optimal versus D-optimal design of screening experiments

Journal of Quality Technology , Volume 53 (4): 14 – Aug 8, 2021

Abstract

Abstract The purpose of this article is to persuade experimenters to choose A-optimal designs rather than D-optimal designs for screening experiments. The primary reason for this advice is that the A-optimality criterion is more consistent with the screening objective than the D-optimality criterion. The goal of screening experiments is to identify an active subset of the factors. An A-optimal design minimizes the average variance of the parameter estimates, which is directly related to that goal. While there are many cases where A- and D-optimal designs coincide, the A-optimal designs tend to have better statistical properties when the A- and D-optimal designs differ. In such cases, A-optimal designs generally have more uncorrelated columns in their model matrices than D-optimal designs. Also, even though A-optimal designs minimize the average variance of the parameter estimates, various cases exist where they outperform D-optimal designs in terms of the variances of all individual parameter estimates. Finally, A-optimal designs can also substantially reduce the worst prediction variance compared with D-optimal designs.

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References (27)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 American Society for Quality
ISSN
2575-6230
eISSN
0022-4065
DOI
10.1080/00224065.2020.1757391
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The purpose of this article is to persuade experimenters to choose A-optimal designs rather than D-optimal designs for screening experiments. The primary reason for this advice is that the A-optimality criterion is more consistent with the screening objective than the D-optimality criterion. The goal of screening experiments is to identify an active subset of the factors. An A-optimal design minimizes the average variance of the parameter estimates, which is directly related to that goal. While there are many cases where A- and D-optimal designs coincide, the A-optimal designs tend to have better statistical properties when the A- and D-optimal designs differ. In such cases, A-optimal designs generally have more uncorrelated columns in their model matrices than D-optimal designs. Also, even though A-optimal designs minimize the average variance of the parameter estimates, various cases exist where they outperform D-optimal designs in terms of the variances of all individual parameter estimates. Finally, A-optimal designs can also substantially reduce the worst prediction variance compared with D-optimal designs.

Journal

Journal of Quality TechnologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 8, 2021

Keywords: main effect; orthogonal array; prediction variance; two-factor interaction effect; two-level design

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