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‘A pond with crocodiles never dries up’: a frame analysis of human–crocodile relationships in agro-pastoral dams in Northern Benin

‘A pond with crocodiles never dries up’: a frame analysis of human–crocodile relationships in... Crocodiles, a protected species, share ecosystem services with local communities in agro-pastoral dams in Northern Benin. Using a comparative case study conducted in three villages and a framing perspective, this study aims to elucidate how stakeholders frame the presence of crocodiles, and how they use formal and informal institutions to deal with them. Respondents framed the presence of the crocodiles as problematic because of their negative effects on local livelihoods and people's tranquillity. Both causes and solutions are, however, framed differently in the three communities. Whereas in Nikki and Sakabansi, respondents seek solutions in changing the ecological environment, requiring others (the council, fishermen, and crocodiles) to change their behaviour, Fombawi respondents seek to adapt their own behaviour by respecting and applying traditional and practical rules for sharing their dam. Damage per crocodile is the highest in Nikki and the lowest in Fombawi, suggesting that the crocodiles in Nikki behave more aggressively than those in Fombawi. Further investigation is merited to determine whether or not crocodiles behave less aggressively when dealt with according to specific institutions. Intensive communication among stakeholders in the three villages is recommended to exchange experiences and ideas that may support a peaceful human–crocodile relationship inspired by existing institutional solutions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability Taylor & Francis

‘A pond with crocodiles never dries up’: a frame analysis of human–crocodile relationships in agro-pastoral dams in Northern Benin

18 pages

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References (59)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1747-762X
eISSN
1473-5903
DOI
10.1080/14735903.2014.909637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crocodiles, a protected species, share ecosystem services with local communities in agro-pastoral dams in Northern Benin. Using a comparative case study conducted in three villages and a framing perspective, this study aims to elucidate how stakeholders frame the presence of crocodiles, and how they use formal and informal institutions to deal with them. Respondents framed the presence of the crocodiles as problematic because of their negative effects on local livelihoods and people's tranquillity. Both causes and solutions are, however, framed differently in the three communities. Whereas in Nikki and Sakabansi, respondents seek solutions in changing the ecological environment, requiring others (the council, fishermen, and crocodiles) to change their behaviour, Fombawi respondents seek to adapt their own behaviour by respecting and applying traditional and practical rules for sharing their dam. Damage per crocodile is the highest in Nikki and the lowest in Fombawi, suggesting that the crocodiles in Nikki behave more aggressively than those in Fombawi. Further investigation is merited to determine whether or not crocodiles behave less aggressively when dealt with according to specific institutions. Intensive communication among stakeholders in the three villages is recommended to exchange experiences and ideas that may support a peaceful human–crocodile relationship inspired by existing institutional solutions.

Journal

International Journal of Agricultural SustainabilityTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 3, 2014

Keywords: water resources management; human–crocodile interaction; framing; formal and informal rules; competing claims on natural resources

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