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A Relational Comparison: The Gendered Effects of Cross-Border Work in Palestine within a Global Frame

A Relational Comparison: The Gendered Effects of Cross-Border Work in Palestine within a Global... This article sets the gendered effects of low-wage, cross-border labor in Palestine within a global frame of uneven development. Drawing on fieldwork close to Checkpoint 300, between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, we first provide an account that centers Palestinian women’s social reproduction as coconstitutive of male cross-border employment in the Israeli economy. Discussion then moves to consider gendered work in apartheid-era South Africa with the intention not to draw analogies but to explore how labor articulation situated South Africa within the power geometries of globalization. Returning with these analytical tools, we undertake a relational comparison to reconsider the cross-border as a global space. Cutting-edge security technologies and migrants from Thailand are some of the new objects, ideas, and people that coalesce and reshape Palestinian domestic life. The gendered effects of social reproduction are thus connected to both Israel’s military occupation and its location within global capitalism. The article makes three key contributions by (1) foregrounding women in discussion of cross-border labor, (2) explicating state–global relations in regimes of segregation, and (3) mobilizing relational comparison as a tool for understanding local exploitation within global structures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of the American Association of Geographers Taylor & Francis

A Relational Comparison: The Gendered Effects of Cross-Border Work in Palestine within a Global Frame

A Relational Comparison: The Gendered Effects of Cross-Border Work in Palestine within a Global Frame

Annals of the American Association of Geographers , Volume 112 (6): 16 – Aug 18, 2022

Abstract

This article sets the gendered effects of low-wage, cross-border labor in Palestine within a global frame of uneven development. Drawing on fieldwork close to Checkpoint 300, between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, we first provide an account that centers Palestinian women’s social reproduction as coconstitutive of male cross-border employment in the Israeli economy. Discussion then moves to consider gendered work in apartheid-era South Africa with the intention not to draw analogies but to explore how labor articulation situated South Africa within the power geometries of globalization. Returning with these analytical tools, we undertake a relational comparison to reconsider the cross-border as a global space. Cutting-edge security technologies and migrants from Thailand are some of the new objects, ideas, and people that coalesce and reshape Palestinian domestic life. The gendered effects of social reproduction are thus connected to both Israel’s military occupation and its location within global capitalism. The article makes three key contributions by (1) foregrounding women in discussion of cross-border labor, (2) explicating state–global relations in regimes of segregation, and (3) mobilizing relational comparison as a tool for understanding local exploitation within global structures.

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References (99)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
ISSN
2469-4460
eISSN
0269-4452
DOI
10.1080/24694452.2021.2019572
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article sets the gendered effects of low-wage, cross-border labor in Palestine within a global frame of uneven development. Drawing on fieldwork close to Checkpoint 300, between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, we first provide an account that centers Palestinian women’s social reproduction as coconstitutive of male cross-border employment in the Israeli economy. Discussion then moves to consider gendered work in apartheid-era South Africa with the intention not to draw analogies but to explore how labor articulation situated South Africa within the power geometries of globalization. Returning with these analytical tools, we undertake a relational comparison to reconsider the cross-border as a global space. Cutting-edge security technologies and migrants from Thailand are some of the new objects, ideas, and people that coalesce and reshape Palestinian domestic life. The gendered effects of social reproduction are thus connected to both Israel’s military occupation and its location within global capitalism. The article makes three key contributions by (1) foregrounding women in discussion of cross-border labor, (2) explicating state–global relations in regimes of segregation, and (3) mobilizing relational comparison as a tool for understanding local exploitation within global structures.

Journal

Annals of the American Association of GeographersTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 18, 2022

Keywords: apartheid; articulation; Palestine; relational comparison; segregation; 种族隔离; 表述; 巴勒斯坦; 关系对比; 隔离。; apartheid; articulación; comparación relacional; Palestina; segregación

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