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A simple method for detection and counting of oil palm trees using high-resolution multispectral satellite imagery

A simple method for detection and counting of oil palm trees using high-resolution multispectral... In the past, oil palm density has been determined by manually counting trees every year in oil palm plantations. The measurement of density provides important data related to palm productivity, fertilizer needed, weed control costs in a circle around each tree, labourers needed, and needs for other activities. Manual counting requires many workers and has potential problems related to accuracy. Remote sensing provides a potential approach for counting oil palm trees. The main objective of this study is to build a robust and user-friendly method that will allow oil palm managers to count oil palm trees using a remote sensing technique. The oil palm trees analysed in this study have different ages and densities. QuickBird imagery was applied with the six pansharpening methods and was compared with panchromatic QuickBird imagery. The black and white imagery from a false colour composite of pansharpening imagery was processed in three ways: (1) oil palm tree detection, (2) delineation of the oil palm area using the red band, and (3) counting oil palm trees and accuracy assessment. For oil palm detection, we used several filters that contained a Sobel edge detector; texture analysis co-occurrence; and dilate, erode, high-pass, and opening filters. The results of this study improved upon the accuracy of several previous research studies that had an accuracy of about 90–95%. The results in this study show (1) modified intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) resolution merge is suitable for 16-year-old oil palm trees and have rather high density with 100% accuracy; (2) colour normalized (Brovey) is suitable for 21-year-old oil palm trees and have low density with 99.5% accuracy; (3) subtractive resolution merge is suitable for 15- and 18-year-old oil palm trees and have a rather high density with 99.8% accuracy; (4) PC spectral sharpening with 99.3% accuracy is suitable for 10-year-old oil palm trees and have low density; and (5) for all study object conditions, colour normalized (Brovey) and wavelet resolution merge are two pansharpening methods that are suitable for oil palm tree extraction and counting with 98.9% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Remote Sensing Taylor & Francis

A simple method for detection and counting of oil palm trees using high-resolution multispectral satellite imagery

A simple method for detection and counting of oil palm trees using high-resolution multispectral satellite imagery

International Journal of Remote Sensing , Volume 37 (21): 13 – Nov 1, 2016

Abstract

In the past, oil palm density has been determined by manually counting trees every year in oil palm plantations. The measurement of density provides important data related to palm productivity, fertilizer needed, weed control costs in a circle around each tree, labourers needed, and needs for other activities. Manual counting requires many workers and has potential problems related to accuracy. Remote sensing provides a potential approach for counting oil palm trees. The main objective of this study is to build a robust and user-friendly method that will allow oil palm managers to count oil palm trees using a remote sensing technique. The oil palm trees analysed in this study have different ages and densities. QuickBird imagery was applied with the six pansharpening methods and was compared with panchromatic QuickBird imagery. The black and white imagery from a false colour composite of pansharpening imagery was processed in three ways: (1) oil palm tree detection, (2) delineation of the oil palm area using the red band, and (3) counting oil palm trees and accuracy assessment. For oil palm detection, we used several filters that contained a Sobel edge detector; texture analysis co-occurrence; and dilate, erode, high-pass, and opening filters. The results of this study improved upon the accuracy of several previous research studies that had an accuracy of about 90–95%. The results in this study show (1) modified intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) resolution merge is suitable for 16-year-old oil palm trees and have rather high density with 100% accuracy; (2) colour normalized (Brovey) is suitable for 21-year-old oil palm trees and have low density with 99.5% accuracy; (3) subtractive resolution merge is suitable for 15- and 18-year-old oil palm trees and have a rather high density with 99.8% accuracy; (4) PC spectral sharpening with 99.3% accuracy is suitable for 10-year-old oil palm trees and have low density; and (5) for all study object conditions, colour normalized (Brovey) and wavelet resolution merge are two pansharpening methods that are suitable for oil palm tree extraction and counting with 98.9% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively.

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References (31)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1366-5901
DOI
10.1080/01431161.2016.1226527
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the past, oil palm density has been determined by manually counting trees every year in oil palm plantations. The measurement of density provides important data related to palm productivity, fertilizer needed, weed control costs in a circle around each tree, labourers needed, and needs for other activities. Manual counting requires many workers and has potential problems related to accuracy. Remote sensing provides a potential approach for counting oil palm trees. The main objective of this study is to build a robust and user-friendly method that will allow oil palm managers to count oil palm trees using a remote sensing technique. The oil palm trees analysed in this study have different ages and densities. QuickBird imagery was applied with the six pansharpening methods and was compared with panchromatic QuickBird imagery. The black and white imagery from a false colour composite of pansharpening imagery was processed in three ways: (1) oil palm tree detection, (2) delineation of the oil palm area using the red band, and (3) counting oil palm trees and accuracy assessment. For oil palm detection, we used several filters that contained a Sobel edge detector; texture analysis co-occurrence; and dilate, erode, high-pass, and opening filters. The results of this study improved upon the accuracy of several previous research studies that had an accuracy of about 90–95%. The results in this study show (1) modified intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) resolution merge is suitable for 16-year-old oil palm trees and have rather high density with 100% accuracy; (2) colour normalized (Brovey) is suitable for 21-year-old oil palm trees and have low density with 99.5% accuracy; (3) subtractive resolution merge is suitable for 15- and 18-year-old oil palm trees and have a rather high density with 99.8% accuracy; (4) PC spectral sharpening with 99.3% accuracy is suitable for 10-year-old oil palm trees and have low density; and (5) for all study object conditions, colour normalized (Brovey) and wavelet resolution merge are two pansharpening methods that are suitable for oil palm tree extraction and counting with 98.9% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively.

Journal

International Journal of Remote SensingTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2016

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