Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Academic Power: Patterns of Authority in Seven National Systems of Higher Education

Academic Power: Patterns of Authority in Seven National Systems of Higher Education 220 Journal of Higher Education it is either unfair or obvious to remark that the early completion that is so commendable may also cause problems. The final chapters do not have the integrated quality of the rest of the work, and they lack the subtle sense of perspective that is evident elsewhere. A fully formulated critique of the opinions could hardly have been expected within days of their delivery, and on balance most readers would opt for, or surely have urged, speed rather than maturation. But there are risks in coming out so soon, and even Sindler may not have avoided them all. There is one other and possibly more substantial reservation. The political scientist, may tend to find more significance in the political process than would the constitutional lawyer under comparable conditions. So it is with the "politi­ cal" element of Bakke-the suggestion that legislative and administrative bodies may confer racial preferences when university governing boards may not. This distinction surely appealed to Justice Powell, although the reasons for trusting the California Human Rights Commission (for example) more than the University of California Regents were not developed in the opinion. Surely this feature of the case deserves some http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Higher Education Taylor & Francis

Academic Power: Patterns of Authority in Seven National Systems of Higher Education

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 51 (2): 3 – Mar 1, 1980

Academic Power: Patterns of Authority in Seven National Systems of Higher Education

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 51 (2): 3 – Mar 1, 1980

Abstract

220 Journal of Higher Education it is either unfair or obvious to remark that the early completion that is so commendable may also cause problems. The final chapters do not have the integrated quality of the rest of the work, and they lack the subtle sense of perspective that is evident elsewhere. A fully formulated critique of the opinions could hardly have been expected within days of their delivery, and on balance most readers would opt for, or surely have urged, speed rather than maturation. But there are risks in coming out so soon, and even Sindler may not have avoided them all. There is one other and possibly more substantial reservation. The political scientist, may tend to find more significance in the political process than would the constitutional lawyer under comparable conditions. So it is with the "politi­ cal" element of Bakke-the suggestion that legislative and administrative bodies may confer racial preferences when university governing boards may not. This distinction surely appealed to Justice Powell, although the reasons for trusting the California Human Rights Commission (for example) more than the University of California Regents were not developed in the opinion. Surely this feature of the case deserves some

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/academic-power-patterns-of-authority-in-seven-national-systems-of-aHgMELhrQI

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Ohio State University Press
ISSN
1538-4640
eISSN
0022-1546
DOI
10.1080/00221546.1980.11780050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

220 Journal of Higher Education it is either unfair or obvious to remark that the early completion that is so commendable may also cause problems. The final chapters do not have the integrated quality of the rest of the work, and they lack the subtle sense of perspective that is evident elsewhere. A fully formulated critique of the opinions could hardly have been expected within days of their delivery, and on balance most readers would opt for, or surely have urged, speed rather than maturation. But there are risks in coming out so soon, and even Sindler may not have avoided them all. There is one other and possibly more substantial reservation. The political scientist, may tend to find more significance in the political process than would the constitutional lawyer under comparable conditions. So it is with the "politi­ cal" element of Bakke-the suggestion that legislative and administrative bodies may confer racial preferences when university governing boards may not. This distinction surely appealed to Justice Powell, although the reasons for trusting the California Human Rights Commission (for example) more than the University of California Regents were not developed in the opinion. Surely this feature of the case deserves some

Journal

The Journal of Higher EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1980

There are no references for this article.