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Against the Thesis of the “Civic Nation”: The Case of Catalonia in Contemporary Spain

Against the Thesis of the “Civic Nation”: The Case of Catalonia in Contemporary Spain This article combats the empirical deficiencies, theoretical lacunae, and normative biases that beset the literature on nationalism. It focuses on the context of Catalonia in Spain. It documents the diffusion of divergent modes of national identification across different segments of Catalan society. It employs such thick-descriptive detail to challenge the dominant depiction of Catalan nationalism as a “civic nationalism.” It demonstrates that the social bases of support for the Catalan nationalist movement are overwhelmingly “ethnic,” and that the movement is an elite-led, “top down” project. In addition, it critiques the ideal–typical distinction between “civic” and “ethnic” nationalisms upon which the dominant depiction of Catalan nationalism is based, and it advances an alternative typological distinction between “exclusionary” and “assimilationist” nationalist projects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nationalism & Ethnic Politics Taylor & Francis

Against the Thesis of the “Civic Nation”: The Case of Catalonia in Contemporary Spain

Nationalism & Ethnic Politics , Volume 13 (1): 37 – Apr 1, 2007
37 pages

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1557-2986
eISSN
1353-7113
DOI
10.1080/13537110601155734
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article combats the empirical deficiencies, theoretical lacunae, and normative biases that beset the literature on nationalism. It focuses on the context of Catalonia in Spain. It documents the diffusion of divergent modes of national identification across different segments of Catalan society. It employs such thick-descriptive detail to challenge the dominant depiction of Catalan nationalism as a “civic nationalism.” It demonstrates that the social bases of support for the Catalan nationalist movement are overwhelmingly “ethnic,” and that the movement is an elite-led, “top down” project. In addition, it critiques the ideal–typical distinction between “civic” and “ethnic” nationalisms upon which the dominant depiction of Catalan nationalism is based, and it advances an alternative typological distinction between “exclusionary” and “assimilationist” nationalist projects.

Journal

Nationalism & Ethnic PoliticsTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2007

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