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Animal Transex

Animal Transex Myra J. Hird The universe is not only queerer than we suppose, it is queerer than we can suppose. (Haldane 1928, 298) When animals do something that we like we call it natural. When they do something that we don’t like, we call it animalistic. (Weinrich 1982, 203) Introduction Punky and Elvira, two female red-faced Japanese macaques, have lived together for 15 years and raised three adopted juvenile monkeys together. Whether or not they want to marry (or have any recognition of this distinctly human concept) remains beside the point for the moment, as the state of Ohio, and indeed the whole of America it seems, is embroiled in a heated debate about gay marriage. On one side of the debate, Angela Murray, executive director of the Human Rights for Animals organisation, argues that it is Punky and Elvira’s right to have a full wedding that carries the same legal entitlements as human marriages. At the opposite end, Roberta Crombs, president of the Christian United Movement disagrees: ‘Animals marrying? That’s beyond being ‘‘under attack.’’ These zealots have scaled the walls and society has begun to crumble!’ (Busse 2004, 2). Non-human animals have for some time been overburdened with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Feminist Studies Taylor & Francis

Animal Transex

Australian Feminist Studies , Volume 21 (49): 16 – Mar 1, 2006
16 pages

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References (65)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1465-3303
eISSN
0816-4649
DOI
10.1080/08164640500470636
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Myra J. Hird The universe is not only queerer than we suppose, it is queerer than we can suppose. (Haldane 1928, 298) When animals do something that we like we call it natural. When they do something that we don’t like, we call it animalistic. (Weinrich 1982, 203) Introduction Punky and Elvira, two female red-faced Japanese macaques, have lived together for 15 years and raised three adopted juvenile monkeys together. Whether or not they want to marry (or have any recognition of this distinctly human concept) remains beside the point for the moment, as the state of Ohio, and indeed the whole of America it seems, is embroiled in a heated debate about gay marriage. On one side of the debate, Angela Murray, executive director of the Human Rights for Animals organisation, argues that it is Punky and Elvira’s right to have a full wedding that carries the same legal entitlements as human marriages. At the opposite end, Roberta Crombs, president of the Christian United Movement disagrees: ‘Animals marrying? That’s beyond being ‘‘under attack.’’ These zealots have scaled the walls and society has begun to crumble!’ (Busse 2004, 2). Non-human animals have for some time been overburdened with the

Journal

Australian Feminist StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2006

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