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Assessing miserly information processing: An expansion of the Cognitive Reflection Test

Assessing miserly information processing: An expansion of the Cognitive Reflection Test The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005) is designed to measure the tendency to override a prepotent response alternative that is incorrect and to engage in further reflection that leads to the correct response. It is a prime measure of the miserly information processing posited by most dual process theories. The original three-item test may be becoming known to potential participants, however. We examined a four-item version that could serve as a substitute for the original. Our data show that it displays a .58 correlation with the original version and that it has very similar relationships with cognitive ability, various thinking dispositions, and with several other rational thinking tasks. Combining the two versions into a seven-item test resulted in a measure of miserly processing with substantial reliability (.72). The seven-item version was a strong independent predictor of performance on rational thinking tasks after the variance accounted for by cognitive ability and thinking dispositions had been partialled out. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Thinking & Reasoning Taylor & Francis

Assessing miserly information processing: An expansion of the Cognitive Reflection Test

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References (65)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1464-0708
eISSN
1354-6783
DOI
10.1080/13546783.2013.844729
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005) is designed to measure the tendency to override a prepotent response alternative that is incorrect and to engage in further reflection that leads to the correct response. It is a prime measure of the miserly information processing posited by most dual process theories. The original three-item test may be becoming known to potential participants, however. We examined a four-item version that could serve as a substitute for the original. Our data show that it displays a .58 correlation with the original version and that it has very similar relationships with cognitive ability, various thinking dispositions, and with several other rational thinking tasks. Combining the two versions into a seven-item test resulted in a measure of miserly processing with substantial reliability (.72). The seven-item version was a strong independent predictor of performance on rational thinking tasks after the variance accounted for by cognitive ability and thinking dispositions had been partialled out.

Journal

Thinking & ReasoningTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2014

Keywords: Cognitive Reflection Test; Rational thinking; Cognitive ability; Thinking dispositions; Dual process theory.

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