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Book reviews

Book reviews Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach Martha C. Nussbaum New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000 312 pp. ISBN 0-521-66086-6 9 9 9 n her recent book, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, Martha C. Nussbaum proposes that all governments should protect and encourage human capabilities: what each individual can do and can be. This philosophy rests on the principle of each person as an end; that is, no person should be treated as a means to another individual's end. She is careful to draw a distinction between capability and functioning. The appropriate political goal is insuring that each person has opportunities to function (Nussbaum's principle of each person's capability); however, each person is free to decide whether to take up these functions. Nussbaum believes that social and political institutions should be structured to insure at least a minimum level of human capabilities. Governments should promote the development of these capabilities and also prepare the environment so it is favorable for the exercise of these capabilities. She proposes (70-80), a list of central capabilities that should be available to each individual: (1) life, (2) bodily health, (3) bodily integrity, (4) senses, imagination, and thought, (5) emotions, (6) practical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forum for Social Economics Taylor & Francis

Book reviews

Forum for Social Economics , Volume 31 (2): 9 – Jan 1, 2002

Abstract

Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach Martha C. Nussbaum New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000 312 pp. ISBN 0-521-66086-6 9 9 9 n her recent book, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, Martha C. Nussbaum proposes that all governments should protect and encourage human capabilities: what each individual can do and can be. This philosophy rests on the principle of each person as an end; that is, no person should be treated as a means to another individual's end. She is careful to draw a distinction between capability and functioning. The appropriate political goal is insuring that each person has opportunities to function (Nussbaum's principle of each person's capability); however, each person is free to decide whether to take up these functions. Nussbaum believes that social and political institutions should be structured to insure at least a minimum level of human capabilities. Governments should promote the development of these capabilities and also prepare the environment so it is favorable for the exercise of these capabilities. She proposes (70-80), a list of central capabilities that should be available to each individual: (1) life, (2) bodily health, (3) bodily integrity, (4) senses, imagination, and thought, (5) emotions, (6) practical

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References (8)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1874-6381
eISSN
0736-0932
DOI
10.1007/BF02779061
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach Martha C. Nussbaum New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000 312 pp. ISBN 0-521-66086-6 9 9 9 n her recent book, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, Martha C. Nussbaum proposes that all governments should protect and encourage human capabilities: what each individual can do and can be. This philosophy rests on the principle of each person as an end; that is, no person should be treated as a means to another individual's end. She is careful to draw a distinction between capability and functioning. The appropriate political goal is insuring that each person has opportunities to function (Nussbaum's principle of each person's capability); however, each person is free to decide whether to take up these functions. Nussbaum believes that social and political institutions should be structured to insure at least a minimum level of human capabilities. Governments should promote the development of these capabilities and also prepare the environment so it is favorable for the exercise of these capabilities. She proposes (70-80), a list of central capabilities that should be available to each individual: (1) life, (2) bodily health, (3) bodily integrity, (4) senses, imagination, and thought, (5) emotions, (6) practical

Journal

Forum for Social EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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