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Can ecological restoration improve soil properties and plant growth in valley-slope sand dunes on southern Tibetan Plateau?

Can ecological restoration improve soil properties and plant growth in valley-slope sand dunes on... Global warming poses a serious threat to the alpine grassland on the Tibetan Plateau. Ecological restoration is an effective measure for adapting to climate change and controlling desertification. However, few studies have focused on the relationship between plant growth and the soil properties of valley-slope sand dunes during ecological restoration. We conducted a case study to investigate the changes in the soil properties at various elevations during two stages of ecological restoration. Our results indicated improvements in the plant growth and soil quality during the ecological restoration from 2011 to 2017. The soil particle size changed from predominantly medium-fine sand at stage 1 (2011) to very fine sand at stage 2 (2017). The soil organic matter and total N content ranged from 1.04–1.10 g·kg−1 and 0.06–0.07 g·kg−1 at different elevations in stage 1 and increased to 12.30–14.75 g·kg−1 and 2.82–3.08 g·kg−1, respectively, in stage 2. Higher plants were distributed mainly in the midslope area at stage 2. A significant positive correlation was observed between pH and plant height at stage 2. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in soils and plants on sandy land and their relationships during ecological restoration of alpine valleys. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Geography Taylor & Francis

Can ecological restoration improve soil properties and plant growth in valley-slope sand dunes on southern Tibetan Plateau?

Can ecological restoration improve soil properties and plant growth in valley-slope sand dunes on southern Tibetan Plateau?

Physical Geography , Volume 42 (2): 17 – Mar 4, 2021

Abstract

Global warming poses a serious threat to the alpine grassland on the Tibetan Plateau. Ecological restoration is an effective measure for adapting to climate change and controlling desertification. However, few studies have focused on the relationship between plant growth and the soil properties of valley-slope sand dunes during ecological restoration. We conducted a case study to investigate the changes in the soil properties at various elevations during two stages of ecological restoration. Our results indicated improvements in the plant growth and soil quality during the ecological restoration from 2011 to 2017. The soil particle size changed from predominantly medium-fine sand at stage 1 (2011) to very fine sand at stage 2 (2017). The soil organic matter and total N content ranged from 1.04–1.10 g·kg−1 and 0.06–0.07 g·kg−1 at different elevations in stage 1 and increased to 12.30–14.75 g·kg−1 and 2.82–3.08 g·kg−1, respectively, in stage 2. Higher plants were distributed mainly in the midslope area at stage 2. A significant positive correlation was observed between pH and plant height at stage 2. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in soils and plants on sandy land and their relationships during ecological restoration of alpine valleys.

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References (33)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1930-0557
eISSN
0272-3646
DOI
10.1080/02723646.2020.1735859
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global warming poses a serious threat to the alpine grassland on the Tibetan Plateau. Ecological restoration is an effective measure for adapting to climate change and controlling desertification. However, few studies have focused on the relationship between plant growth and the soil properties of valley-slope sand dunes during ecological restoration. We conducted a case study to investigate the changes in the soil properties at various elevations during two stages of ecological restoration. Our results indicated improvements in the plant growth and soil quality during the ecological restoration from 2011 to 2017. The soil particle size changed from predominantly medium-fine sand at stage 1 (2011) to very fine sand at stage 2 (2017). The soil organic matter and total N content ranged from 1.04–1.10 g·kg−1 and 0.06–0.07 g·kg−1 at different elevations in stage 1 and increased to 12.30–14.75 g·kg−1 and 2.82–3.08 g·kg−1, respectively, in stage 2. Higher plants were distributed mainly in the midslope area at stage 2. A significant positive correlation was observed between pH and plant height at stage 2. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in soils and plants on sandy land and their relationships during ecological restoration of alpine valleys.

Journal

Physical GeographyTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 4, 2021

Keywords: Ecological restoration; desertification; alpine ecosystems; plant growth; soil properties; Tibetan Plateau

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