Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Church-in-a-box: making space sacred in a non-traditional setting

Church-in-a-box: making space sacred in a non-traditional setting How are non-traditional sacred spaces experienced and sacralized? Non-traditional sacred sites offer a unique and useful perspective for exploring notions of sacralization, the process of making space sacred. This paper explores sacralization through an investigation of Unity of Fredericksburg, a non-traditional spiritual community that meets in an executive office building, using in-depth interviews with church leaders and members. These interview findings help shed light on how the process of sacralization occurs and suggest that it is the collective, emotional engagement with space that makes it sacred. Non-traditional houses of worship, though not imbued with conventional notions of “sacredness”, serve as functionally sacred for believers and the transiency of their sacred qualities provides a useful foundation for geographers of religion to explore how the sacred is made and experienced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cultural Geography Taylor & Francis

Church-in-a-box: making space sacred in a non-traditional setting

Journal of Cultural Geography , Volume 34 (3): 21 – Sep 2, 2017

Church-in-a-box: making space sacred in a non-traditional setting

Journal of Cultural Geography , Volume 34 (3): 21 – Sep 2, 2017

Abstract

How are non-traditional sacred spaces experienced and sacralized? Non-traditional sacred sites offer a unique and useful perspective for exploring notions of sacralization, the process of making space sacred. This paper explores sacralization through an investigation of Unity of Fredericksburg, a non-traditional spiritual community that meets in an executive office building, using in-depth interviews with church leaders and members. These interview findings help shed light on how the process of sacralization occurs and suggest that it is the collective, emotional engagement with space that makes it sacred. Non-traditional houses of worship, though not imbued with conventional notions of “sacredness”, serve as functionally sacred for believers and the transiency of their sacred qualities provides a useful foundation for geographers of religion to explore how the sacred is made and experienced.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/church-in-a-box-making-space-sacred-in-a-non-traditional-setting-w6RQBqiUtI

References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1940-6320
eISSN
0887-3631
DOI
10.1080/08873631.2016.1264262
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

How are non-traditional sacred spaces experienced and sacralized? Non-traditional sacred sites offer a unique and useful perspective for exploring notions of sacralization, the process of making space sacred. This paper explores sacralization through an investigation of Unity of Fredericksburg, a non-traditional spiritual community that meets in an executive office building, using in-depth interviews with church leaders and members. These interview findings help shed light on how the process of sacralization occurs and suggest that it is the collective, emotional engagement with space that makes it sacred. Non-traditional houses of worship, though not imbued with conventional notions of “sacredness”, serve as functionally sacred for believers and the transiency of their sacred qualities provides a useful foundation for geographers of religion to explore how the sacred is made and experienced.

Journal

Journal of Cultural GeographyTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 2, 2017

Keywords: Geography of religion; emotion; sacralization; non-traditional sacred space; Unity Church

There are no references for this article.