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Citizenship, Community, and Struggles for Public Space

Citizenship, Community, and Struggles for Public Space On April 16, 1993, a group of male students at the University of Colorado got into a fight with another group of males not associated with the university; this fight unleashed a broader debate over who should have access to the public spaces surrounding the university. We examine this debate in terms of its implications for citizenship, public space, and community. We discuss conflicts over public space and the role these conflicts have played in defining a citizenship that rejects notions of equal membership in a larger polity. This strategy is examined using newspaper accounts, interviews, and participant observation techniques to understand the conflict over access to “the Hill” in Boulder, Colorado. Central to these conflicts is the issue of how “the public” is constituted. As we detail the actions of agents involved in the Hill, it will become clear that this fight is about competing definitions of who belongs to the public, who is a citizen, and what should be the criteria for membership in the public or community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Professional Geographer Taylor & Francis

Citizenship, Community, and Struggles for Public Space

The Professional Geographer , Volume 49 (1): 11 – Feb 1, 1997
11 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1467-9272
eISSN
0033-0124
DOI
10.1111/0033-0124.00053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On April 16, 1993, a group of male students at the University of Colorado got into a fight with another group of males not associated with the university; this fight unleashed a broader debate over who should have access to the public spaces surrounding the university. We examine this debate in terms of its implications for citizenship, public space, and community. We discuss conflicts over public space and the role these conflicts have played in defining a citizenship that rejects notions of equal membership in a larger polity. This strategy is examined using newspaper accounts, interviews, and participant observation techniques to understand the conflict over access to “the Hill” in Boulder, Colorado. Central to these conflicts is the issue of how “the public” is constituted. As we detail the actions of agents involved in the Hill, it will become clear that this fight is about competing definitions of who belongs to the public, who is a citizen, and what should be the criteria for membership in the public or community.

Journal

The Professional GeographerTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 1997

Keywords: citizenship; public space; counterculture; community

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