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Colored Cosmopolitanism: The Shared Struggle for Freedom in the United States and India

Colored Cosmopolitanism: The Shared Struggle for Freedom in the United States and India 104 Social History VOL.38 : NO.1 US company in Latin American history. More than this, however, the book offers a provocative interpretation of what drove US empire during this key period while placing US understandings of race at the heart of labour regimes, migration, imperial culture and nation formation within Central America. In this sense, it does not simply help us understand how the United States became the dominant power in the region; it also helps us understand how US imperial culture was fashioned and what it meant for Central America. The Business of Empire is quite readable and ideal for the classroom. It will also be read with great benefit by historians and other scholars of Latin America, the United States, empire, race, labour, commodities and nationalism. Steve Striffler University of New Orleans q 2013, Steve Striffler http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03071022.2013.758809 Nico Slate, Colored Cosmopolitanism: The Shared Struggle for Freedom in the United States and India (2012), 321 (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA and London, £29.95/$39.95). We can glimpse some of the correspondences between South Asian and African American histories by considering a few roughly contemporaneous pairings: the Rebellion of 1857 and the Dred Scott Decision, Queen Victoria’s proclamation as Empress http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social History Taylor & Francis

Colored Cosmopolitanism: The Shared Struggle for Freedom in the United States and India

Social History , Volume 38 (1): 3 – Feb 1, 2013
3 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1470-1200
eISSN
0307-1022
DOI
10.1080/03071022.2013.758800
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

104 Social History VOL.38 : NO.1 US company in Latin American history. More than this, however, the book offers a provocative interpretation of what drove US empire during this key period while placing US understandings of race at the heart of labour regimes, migration, imperial culture and nation formation within Central America. In this sense, it does not simply help us understand how the United States became the dominant power in the region; it also helps us understand how US imperial culture was fashioned and what it meant for Central America. The Business of Empire is quite readable and ideal for the classroom. It will also be read with great benefit by historians and other scholars of Latin America, the United States, empire, race, labour, commodities and nationalism. Steve Striffler University of New Orleans q 2013, Steve Striffler http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03071022.2013.758809 Nico Slate, Colored Cosmopolitanism: The Shared Struggle for Freedom in the United States and India (2012), 321 (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA and London, £29.95/$39.95). We can glimpse some of the correspondences between South Asian and African American histories by considering a few roughly contemporaneous pairings: the Rebellion of 1857 and the Dred Scott Decision, Queen Victoria’s proclamation as Empress

Journal

Social HistoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 2013

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