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Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field

Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES, 2017 VOL. 40, NO. 9, 1486–1491 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2017.1308528 40TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL ISSUE CLASSIC PAPERS IN CONTEXT A RESPONSE TO JANINE DAHINDEN Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field a,b c d Alejandro Portes , Luis Eduardo Guarnizo and Patricia Landolt a b Department of Sociology, Princeton University, Princeton, USA; University of Miami School of Law, Coral Gables, USA; Department of Human Ecology, University of California-Davis, Davis, USA; Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Janine Dahinden has written a thoughtful and provocative commentary on our 1999 article on immigrant transnationalism. We agree with many of her points and even with some of the critiques levelled at the original article. Before com- menting on this, it may be worth recalling where things were back in the 1990s and what our article attempted to accomplish then. The enthusiasm unleashed by Nations Unbound by social anthropologists Basch, Glick-Schiller, and Blanc- Szanton (1994) was followed by a veritable explosion of both qualitative studies and speculative writings leading to the impression that all immigrants were involved in transnational activities and that transnationalism represented a new “paradigm” for the understanding of global phenomena. Our http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnic and Racial Studies Taylor & Francis

Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field

Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 40 (9): 6 – Jul 15, 2017

Abstract

ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES, 2017 VOL. 40, NO. 9, 1486–1491 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2017.1308528 40TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL ISSUE CLASSIC PAPERS IN CONTEXT A RESPONSE TO JANINE DAHINDEN Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field a,b c d Alejandro Portes , Luis Eduardo Guarnizo and Patricia Landolt a b Department of Sociology, Princeton University, Princeton, USA; University of Miami School of Law, Coral Gables, USA; Department of Human Ecology, University of California-Davis, Davis, USA; Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Janine Dahinden has written a thoughtful and provocative commentary on our 1999 article on immigrant transnationalism. We agree with many of her points and even with some of the critiques levelled at the original article. Before com- menting on this, it may be worth recalling where things were back in the 1990s and what our article attempted to accomplish then. The enthusiasm unleashed by Nations Unbound by social anthropologists Basch, Glick-Schiller, and Blanc- Szanton (1994) was followed by a veritable explosion of both qualitative studies and speculative writings leading to the impression that all immigrants were involved in transnational activities and that transnationalism represented a new “paradigm” for the understanding of global phenomena. Our

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References (97)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1466-4356
eISSN
0141-9870
DOI
10.1080/01419870.2017.1308528
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES, 2017 VOL. 40, NO. 9, 1486–1491 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2017.1308528 40TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL ISSUE CLASSIC PAPERS IN CONTEXT A RESPONSE TO JANINE DAHINDEN Commentary on the study of transnationalism: pitfalls and promise of an emergent research field a,b c d Alejandro Portes , Luis Eduardo Guarnizo and Patricia Landolt a b Department of Sociology, Princeton University, Princeton, USA; University of Miami School of Law, Coral Gables, USA; Department of Human Ecology, University of California-Davis, Davis, USA; Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Janine Dahinden has written a thoughtful and provocative commentary on our 1999 article on immigrant transnationalism. We agree with many of her points and even with some of the critiques levelled at the original article. Before com- menting on this, it may be worth recalling where things were back in the 1990s and what our article attempted to accomplish then. The enthusiasm unleashed by Nations Unbound by social anthropologists Basch, Glick-Schiller, and Blanc- Szanton (1994) was followed by a veritable explosion of both qualitative studies and speculative writings leading to the impression that all immigrants were involved in transnational activities and that transnationalism represented a new “paradigm” for the understanding of global phenomena. Our

Journal

Ethnic and Racial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 15, 2017

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