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Conflation between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility: a critical review of the Jingle Fallacy

Conflation between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility: a... Cognitive flexibility is a widely studied construct and is considered an important treatment target for several psychological disorders. The convergence of several independent fields of research has led to assumptions about the assessment of cognitive flexibility – assumptions that are not empirically supported and often conflate different notions of flexibility. This critical review discusses how the conflation of self-report and neurocognitive assessments has seemingly arisen from literature on eating disorders. We describe how seminal early observations of “inflexible” personality characteristics, communication competence research, and investigations of frontal lobe function after injury led to two methods of assessing “cognitive flexibility”. We discuss the impact that conflation of self-report and neurocognitive assessments has had on the field, and we provide recommendations for assessing cognitive flexibility in both research and clinical settings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Psychology Taylor & Francis

Conflation between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility: a critical review of the Jingle Fallacy

11 pages

Conflation between self-report and neurocognitive assessments of cognitive flexibility: a critical review of the Jingle Fallacy

Abstract

Cognitive flexibility is a widely studied construct and is considered an important treatment target for several psychological disorders. The convergence of several independent fields of research has led to assumptions about the assessment of cognitive flexibility – assumptions that are not empirically supported and often conflate different notions of flexibility. This critical review discusses how the conflation of self-report and neurocognitive assessments has seemingly arisen from...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
ISSN
1742-9536
eISSN
0004-9530
DOI
10.1080/00049530.2023.2174684
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cognitive flexibility is a widely studied construct and is considered an important treatment target for several psychological disorders. The convergence of several independent fields of research has led to assumptions about the assessment of cognitive flexibility – assumptions that are not empirically supported and often conflate different notions of flexibility. This critical review discusses how the conflation of self-report and neurocognitive assessments has seemingly arisen from literature on eating disorders. We describe how seminal early observations of “inflexible” personality characteristics, communication competence research, and investigations of frontal lobe function after injury led to two methods of assessing “cognitive flexibility”. We discuss the impact that conflation of self-report and neurocognitive assessments has had on the field, and we provide recommendations for assessing cognitive flexibility in both research and clinical settings.

Journal

Australian Journal of PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 31, 2023

Keywords: Executive function; neuropsychology; personality; feeding and eating disorders; surveys and questionnaires

References