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Dark tourism and the celebrity prisoner: Front and back regions in representations of an Australian historical prison

Dark tourism and the celebrity prisoner: Front and back regions in representations of an... Dark Tourism and the Celebrity Prisoner: Front and Back Regions in Representations of an Australian Historical Prison Jacqueline Zara Wilson Gossip magazines are notorious for their practice of sensationally revealing the mundane side of celebrities' lives, especially where it is seen to be incompatible with the celebrity's presentation of their public self. The celebrity's preoccupation with maintaining an appropriately splendid public image, and his/her concomitant preoccupation with concealing what goes on behind that facade, constitute a personal dichotomy innate to everyone — albeit writ large in the case of the celebrity or public figure. Social psychologist Erving Goffman explains this dichotomy in terms of a 'dramaturgical' model of the human self composed of internal 'regions' of self-construction.' These comprise 'front regions', in which are performed those activities the self considers acceptable for public consumption, and 'back regions', or 'backstage' areas, where the less acceptable activities occur. On the basis of this model, Goffman suggests that the functional public self involves a 'performance'.2 It has been remarked that 'Goffman's work has no systematic relationship to abstract academic theory and provides no encouragement to attempts to advance such theory';3 his central aim, as an 'ethnographer of the self',4 was to characterise. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Australian Studies Taylor & Francis

Dark tourism and the celebrity prisoner: Front and back regions in representations of an Australian historical prison

Journal of Australian Studies , Volume 28 (82): 13 – Jan 1, 2004
13 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1835-6419
eISSN
1444-3058
DOI
10.1080/14443050409387951
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dark Tourism and the Celebrity Prisoner: Front and Back Regions in Representations of an Australian Historical Prison Jacqueline Zara Wilson Gossip magazines are notorious for their practice of sensationally revealing the mundane side of celebrities' lives, especially where it is seen to be incompatible with the celebrity's presentation of their public self. The celebrity's preoccupation with maintaining an appropriately splendid public image, and his/her concomitant preoccupation with concealing what goes on behind that facade, constitute a personal dichotomy innate to everyone — albeit writ large in the case of the celebrity or public figure. Social psychologist Erving Goffman explains this dichotomy in terms of a 'dramaturgical' model of the human self composed of internal 'regions' of self-construction.' These comprise 'front regions', in which are performed those activities the self considers acceptable for public consumption, and 'back regions', or 'backstage' areas, where the less acceptable activities occur. On the basis of this model, Goffman suggests that the functional public self involves a 'performance'.2 It has been remarked that 'Goffman's work has no systematic relationship to abstract academic theory and provides no encouragement to attempts to advance such theory';3 his central aim, as an 'ethnographer of the self',4 was to characterise.

Journal

Journal of Australian StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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