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Designing garden city landscapes: Works by Marjorie L. Sewell Cautley, 1922–1937

Designing garden city landscapes: Works by Marjorie L. Sewell Cautley, 1922–1937 Abstract According to planner and landscape architect Henry Wright, the successes of the ‘new towns’ of Radburn, New Jersey, and Sunnyside in Brooklyn, New York, were definitely and irrevocably related to [their] site and setting1. The setting was in each case a landscape designed by Marjorie Sewell Cautley in conjunction with a team of architects and landscape architects led by Clarence Stein and Henry Wright. These designers recognized the need to think holistically, conceiving a total environment in which physical design strove to preserve, enhance, and render visible the vitality of natural systems, as well as the individual and social lives of residents2. While a study of the landscape would appear key to the theoretical and design history of the garden city movement, historians and critics have generally bypassed any in-depth inquiry into the designed landscapes for garden cities.3 The work of Cautley for the Stein-Wright design team is particularly interesting as it simultaneously reveals the ideals of the garden city movement as well as a feminist inscription on the land. An analysis of Cantley's landscape designs specifically reflects her experience as a professional landscape architect and a woman and mother.4 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes Taylor & Francis

Designing garden city landscapes: Works by Marjorie L. Sewell Cautley, 1922–1937

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1943-2186
eISSN
1460-1176
DOI
10.1080/14601176.2005.10435449
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract According to planner and landscape architect Henry Wright, the successes of the ‘new towns’ of Radburn, New Jersey, and Sunnyside in Brooklyn, New York, were definitely and irrevocably related to [their] site and setting1. The setting was in each case a landscape designed by Marjorie Sewell Cautley in conjunction with a team of architects and landscape architects led by Clarence Stein and Henry Wright. These designers recognized the need to think holistically, conceiving a total environment in which physical design strove to preserve, enhance, and render visible the vitality of natural systems, as well as the individual and social lives of residents2. While a study of the landscape would appear key to the theoretical and design history of the garden city movement, historians and critics have generally bypassed any in-depth inquiry into the designed landscapes for garden cities.3 The work of Cautley for the Stein-Wright design team is particularly interesting as it simultaneously reveals the ideals of the garden city movement as well as a feminist inscription on the land. An analysis of Cantley's landscape designs specifically reflects her experience as a professional landscape architect and a woman and mother.4

Journal

Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed LandscapesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2005

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