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Digging up Pook’s Hill: Archaeological Imaginaries in Kipling’s Puck Stories

Digging up Pook’s Hill: Archaeological Imaginaries in Kipling’s Puck Stories AbstractSeveral writers including Simon Schama, Rosemary Sutcliff and G. M. Trevelyan have noted the powerful evocations of landscape in Rudyard Kipling’s two volumes of stories, Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906) and Rewards and Fairies (1910). The Puck stories are time-slip narratives in which the two young protagonists, based on Kipling’s own children, meet a series of figures from the past who tell them stories of their lives and adventures. My aim in this paper is to examine the two most prominently featured landscapes in these stories: Hadrian’s Wall (as described by Kipling’s Centurion Parnesius) and the rural Sussex surroundings of Bateman’s, Kipling’s home near the village of Burwash. While Kipling’s depiction of the Wall has been widely criticised for historical inaccuracy, his bucolic Sussex landscape is generally regarded as accurately reflecting the world outside his windows. I show in this paper that the two landscapes are in fact both largely Kipling’s inventions, the products of an imagination inspired by archaeological discoveries and adept at using artefacts and historic features to bring together past and present in a place. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscapes Taylor & Francis

Digging up Pook’s Hill: Archaeological Imaginaries in Kipling’s Puck Stories

Landscapes , Volume 13 (1): 16 – Jun 1, 2012
16 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© Gabriel Moshenska 2013
ISSN
2040-8153
eISSN
1466-2035
DOI
10.1179/lan.2012.13.1.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractSeveral writers including Simon Schama, Rosemary Sutcliff and G. M. Trevelyan have noted the powerful evocations of landscape in Rudyard Kipling’s two volumes of stories, Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906) and Rewards and Fairies (1910). The Puck stories are time-slip narratives in which the two young protagonists, based on Kipling’s own children, meet a series of figures from the past who tell them stories of their lives and adventures. My aim in this paper is to examine the two most prominently featured landscapes in these stories: Hadrian’s Wall (as described by Kipling’s Centurion Parnesius) and the rural Sussex surroundings of Bateman’s, Kipling’s home near the village of Burwash. While Kipling’s depiction of the Wall has been widely criticised for historical inaccuracy, his bucolic Sussex landscape is generally regarded as accurately reflecting the world outside his windows. I show in this paper that the two landscapes are in fact both largely Kipling’s inventions, the products of an imagination inspired by archaeological discoveries and adept at using artefacts and historic features to bring together past and present in a place.

Journal

LandscapesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2012

References