Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Disability and Suicidal Ideation among Indigenous Adults in Canada: Cultural Resources as Contingencies

Disability and Suicidal Ideation among Indigenous Adults in Canada: Cultural Resources as... Abstract Objectives The present study asks: Is disability associated with suicidal ideation among Indigenous adults in Canada? And if so, do cultural resources—as measured by cultural identity affect, cultural group belonging, cultural engagement, and cultural exploration—modify this association? Methods Data were from a nationally representative sample of First Nations peoples living off-reserve, Métis, and Inuit across Canada—the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (N = 16,125). A series of weighted logistic regression models were performed. Results Indigenous adults with disabilities were significantly more likely than those without disabilities to report suicidal ideation, even after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics and physical and mental health conditions. At the same time, people with multiple disabilities were at greater risk for suicidal ideation, with the largest association among those with five or more disabilities. Furthermore, the detrimental association between disability status and suicidal ideation attenuated among those who reported cultural group belonging. In a similar vein, the buffering role of cultural group belonging was also observed in the association between the number of disabilities and suicidal ideation. Conclusions This study provides compelling evidence that disability is a risk factor for suicidal ideation among Indigenous adults and that cultural group belonging plays a stress-buffering role in this relationship. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Suicide Research Taylor & Francis

Disability and Suicidal Ideation among Indigenous Adults in Canada: Cultural Resources as Contingencies

Archives of Suicide Research , Volume OnlineFirst: 19 – Apr 19, 2023
19 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/disability-and-suicidal-ideation-among-indigenous-adults-in-canada-anuL0E3tQB

References (35)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2023 International Academy for Suicide Research
ISSN
1543-6136
eISSN
1381-1118
DOI
10.1080/13811118.2023.2199803
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Objectives The present study asks: Is disability associated with suicidal ideation among Indigenous adults in Canada? And if so, do cultural resources—as measured by cultural identity affect, cultural group belonging, cultural engagement, and cultural exploration—modify this association? Methods Data were from a nationally representative sample of First Nations peoples living off-reserve, Métis, and Inuit across Canada—the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (N = 16,125). A series of weighted logistic regression models were performed. Results Indigenous adults with disabilities were significantly more likely than those without disabilities to report suicidal ideation, even after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics and physical and mental health conditions. At the same time, people with multiple disabilities were at greater risk for suicidal ideation, with the largest association among those with five or more disabilities. Furthermore, the detrimental association between disability status and suicidal ideation attenuated among those who reported cultural group belonging. In a similar vein, the buffering role of cultural group belonging was also observed in the association between the number of disabilities and suicidal ideation. Conclusions This study provides compelling evidence that disability is a risk factor for suicidal ideation among Indigenous adults and that cultural group belonging plays a stress-buffering role in this relationship.

Journal

Archives of Suicide ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 19, 2023

Keywords: Culture; disability; Indigenous adults; suicidal ideation

There are no references for this article.