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Does Stigmatization Motivate People to Quit Smoking? Examining the Effect of Stigmatizing Anti-Smoking Campaigns on Cessation Intention

Does Stigmatization Motivate People to Quit Smoking? Examining the Effect of Stigmatizing... Stigmatization against smokers characterizes many of today’s anti-smoking campaigns in the United States. It is believed that stigmatization motivates people to quit smoking by arousing a state of emotional distress, such as shame, in viewers. However, stagnant cessation rates among socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers imply that stigmatizing campaigns might be ineffective in promoting cessation among those low in socioeconomic status. To understand the effectiveness of stigmatizing campaign messages, we proposed a moderated mediation model and experimentally tested it among current smokers (n = 136). Results show that exposure to a stigmatizing message significantly lowered smokers’ cessation intentions who have lower income and less self-efficacy. The conditional negative effect of the message was accounted for by shame experienced by smokers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Communication Taylor & Francis

Does Stigmatization Motivate People to Quit Smoking? Examining the Effect of Stigmatizing Anti-Smoking Campaigns on Cessation Intention

Health Communication , Volume 33 (6): 9 – Jun 3, 2018

Does Stigmatization Motivate People to Quit Smoking? Examining the Effect of Stigmatizing Anti-Smoking Campaigns on Cessation Intention

Health Communication , Volume 33 (6): 9 – Jun 3, 2018

Abstract

Stigmatization against smokers characterizes many of today’s anti-smoking campaigns in the United States. It is believed that stigmatization motivates people to quit smoking by arousing a state of emotional distress, such as shame, in viewers. However, stagnant cessation rates among socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers imply that stigmatizing campaigns might be ineffective in promoting cessation among those low in socioeconomic status. To understand the effectiveness of stigmatizing campaign messages, we proposed a moderated mediation model and experimentally tested it among current smokers (n = 136). Results show that exposure to a stigmatizing message significantly lowered smokers’ cessation intentions who have lower income and less self-efficacy. The conditional negative effect of the message was accounted for by shame experienced by smokers.

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References (50)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-7027
eISSN
1041-0236
DOI
10.1080/10410236.2017.1299275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Stigmatization against smokers characterizes many of today’s anti-smoking campaigns in the United States. It is believed that stigmatization motivates people to quit smoking by arousing a state of emotional distress, such as shame, in viewers. However, stagnant cessation rates among socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers imply that stigmatizing campaigns might be ineffective in promoting cessation among those low in socioeconomic status. To understand the effectiveness of stigmatizing campaign messages, we proposed a moderated mediation model and experimentally tested it among current smokers (n = 136). Results show that exposure to a stigmatizing message significantly lowered smokers’ cessation intentions who have lower income and less self-efficacy. The conditional negative effect of the message was accounted for by shame experienced by smokers.

Journal

Health CommunicationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 3, 2018

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