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Editorial

Editorial Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies, Volume 13, Number 1, March 2011 EURIPIDIS LOUKIS, ANN MACINTOSH and YANNIS CHARALABIDIS There has been a growing interest of public sector researchers and practitioners in the last 25 years in the involvement of citizens in government decision-making and policy development. This is seen as a complement and reinforcement of representative democracy where citizens not only elect their representatives, who take responsibility for government decisions and policies, but also provide their feedback to them on a continuous and systematic basis. A sound theoretical foundation for these ideas has been developed, which has been followed by practical application in many countries all over the world. Barber (1984) introduces the concept of ‘strong democracy’, which is characterized by active citizen participation and discussion among opposing views. However, he argues that this is not easy, since ‘it entails listening no less than speaking, it is affective as well as cognitive .. . ’, and also requires sufficient ‘civic education’, which can strengthen public discourse and participation in the democratic process. He proposes three forms of civic education for this purpose: formal education in citizenship (including teaching on a nation’s constitution, legal system and political practice), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies Taylor & Francis

Editorial

Abstract

Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies, Volume 13, Number 1, March 2011 EURIPIDIS LOUKIS, ANN MACINTOSH and YANNIS CHARALABIDIS There has been a growing interest of public sector researchers and practitioners in the last 25 years in the involvement of citizens in government decision-making and policy development. This is seen as a complement and reinforcement of representative democracy where citizens not only elect their representatives, who take responsibility for government decisions...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1944-8961
eISSN
1944-8953
DOI
10.1080/19448953.2011.550814
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies, Volume 13, Number 1, March 2011 EURIPIDIS LOUKIS, ANN MACINTOSH and YANNIS CHARALABIDIS There has been a growing interest of public sector researchers and practitioners in the last 25 years in the involvement of citizens in government decision-making and policy development. This is seen as a complement and reinforcement of representative democracy where citizens not only elect their representatives, who take responsibility for government decisions and policies, but also provide their feedback to them on a continuous and systematic basis. A sound theoretical foundation for these ideas has been developed, which has been followed by practical application in many countries all over the world. Barber (1984) introduces the concept of ‘strong democracy’, which is characterized by active citizen participation and discussion among opposing views. However, he argues that this is not easy, since ‘it entails listening no less than speaking, it is affective as well as cognitive .. . ’, and also requires sufficient ‘civic education’, which can strengthen public discourse and participation in the democratic process. He proposes three forms of civic education for this purpose: formal education in citizenship (including teaching on a nation’s constitution, legal system and political practice),

Journal

Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2011

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