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Effect of Immunization against Somatostatin on Antibody Binding Capacity and Affinity, Hormone Concentrations, Performance and Carcass and Meat Quality in Young Friesian Bulls

Effect of Immunization against Somatostatin on Antibody Binding Capacity and Affinity, Hormone... Abstract Eight bull calves were immunized against somatostatin (SS) conjugated to human serum α-globulin (anti-SS), while another 8 were immunized against human serum α-globulin alone (placebo). All calves were tethered, individually fed concentrates ad libitum and slaughtered at an average live weight of 400 kg within each block. Only 5 of the 8 anti-SS calves formed significant amounts of antibodies, with an average binding capacity of 24–34 picomole SS per litre plasma and an antibody affinity (K D) of 0.20 ± 0.04 nM. No difference was found in daily gain (1454 vs. 1378 g, SEM = 71) although voluntary daily energy intake of concentrates was slightly higher (P = 0.17) in anti-SS calves (6.09 vs. 5.54 Scandinavian Feed Units, SEM = 0.27). Feed conversion was also higher (P = 0.08) in. anti-SS calves (4.20 vs. 4.01 SFU/kg gain, SEM = 0.7) and fat content (6.8 vs. 5.4 kg, SEM = 0.3) and amount of perirenal and mesenterial fat (8.45 vs. 6.26 kg, SEM = 0.44) was significantly increased (P < 0.01). Plasma levels of somatotropin and insulin were not altered by immunization. In contrast, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was elevated in anti-SS calves following the 4th immunization (301 vs. 259 ng/ml, SEM = 13). The increased plasma IGF-I concentration is most likely a result of increased feed intake. However, a change in IGF-I secretion from liver cells owing to change in concentration of free SS is another possibility. The increased fat deposition also argues against involvement of ST. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Agri Scand A Animal Sci Taylor & Francis

Effect of Immunization against Somatostatin on Antibody Binding Capacity and Affinity, Hormone Concentrations, Performance and Carcass and Meat Quality in Young Friesian Bulls

Effect of Immunization against Somatostatin on Antibody Binding Capacity and Affinity, Hormone Concentrations, Performance and Carcass and Meat Quality in Young Friesian Bulls

Abstract

Abstract Eight bull calves were immunized against somatostatin (SS) conjugated to human serum α-globulin (anti-SS), while another 8 were immunized against human serum α-globulin alone (placebo). All calves were tethered, individually fed concentrates ad libitum and slaughtered at an average live weight of 400 kg within each block. Only 5 of the 8 anti-SS calves formed significant amounts of antibodies, with an average binding capacity of 24–34 picomole SS per litre plasma...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1651-1972
eISSN
0906-4702
DOI
10.1080/09064709509415839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Eight bull calves were immunized against somatostatin (SS) conjugated to human serum α-globulin (anti-SS), while another 8 were immunized against human serum α-globulin alone (placebo). All calves were tethered, individually fed concentrates ad libitum and slaughtered at an average live weight of 400 kg within each block. Only 5 of the 8 anti-SS calves formed significant amounts of antibodies, with an average binding capacity of 24–34 picomole SS per litre plasma and an antibody affinity (K D) of 0.20 ± 0.04 nM. No difference was found in daily gain (1454 vs. 1378 g, SEM = 71) although voluntary daily energy intake of concentrates was slightly higher (P = 0.17) in anti-SS calves (6.09 vs. 5.54 Scandinavian Feed Units, SEM = 0.27). Feed conversion was also higher (P = 0.08) in. anti-SS calves (4.20 vs. 4.01 SFU/kg gain, SEM = 0.7) and fat content (6.8 vs. 5.4 kg, SEM = 0.3) and amount of perirenal and mesenterial fat (8.45 vs. 6.26 kg, SEM = 0.44) was significantly increased (P < 0.01). Plasma levels of somatotropin and insulin were not altered by immunization. In contrast, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was elevated in anti-SS calves following the 4th immunization (301 vs. 259 ng/ml, SEM = 13). The increased plasma IGF-I concentration is most likely a result of increased feed intake. However, a change in IGF-I secretion from liver cells owing to change in concentration of free SS is another possibility. The increased fat deposition also argues against involvement of ST.

Journal

Acta Agri Scand A Animal SciTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 1995

Keywords: daily gain; fat deposition; feed efficiency; IGF-I; insulin; somatotropin; voluntary feed intake

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