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Effective affective user interface design in games

Effective affective user interface design in games It is proposed that games, which are designed to generate positive affect, are most successful when they facilitate flow (Csikszentmihalyi 1992). Flow is a state of concentration, deep enjoyment, and total absorption in an activity. The study of games, and a resulting understanding of flow in games can inform the design of non-leisure software for positive affect. The paper considers the ways in which computer games contravene Nielsen's guidelines for heuristic evaluation (Nielsen and Molich 1990) and how these contraventions impact on flow. The paper also explores the implications for research that stem from the differences between games played on a personal computer and games played on a dedicated console. This research takes important initial steps towards defining how flow in computer games can inform affective design. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ergonomics Taylor & Francis

Effective affective user interface design in games

Ergonomics , Volume 46 (13-14): 14 – Oct 1, 2003
14 pages

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References (26)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1366-5847
eISSN
0014-0139
DOI
10.1080/00140130310001610865
pmid
14612323
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is proposed that games, which are designed to generate positive affect, are most successful when they facilitate flow (Csikszentmihalyi 1992). Flow is a state of concentration, deep enjoyment, and total absorption in an activity. The study of games, and a resulting understanding of flow in games can inform the design of non-leisure software for positive affect. The paper considers the ways in which computer games contravene Nielsen's guidelines for heuristic evaluation (Nielsen and Molich 1990) and how these contraventions impact on flow. The paper also explores the implications for research that stem from the differences between games played on a personal computer and games played on a dedicated console. This research takes important initial steps towards defining how flow in computer games can inform affective design.

Journal

ErgonomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2003

Keywords: Games; Flow; Affect; User-interface design

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