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Effects of dietary calcium, available phosphorus and vitamin d on growth rate, food utilisation, plasma and bone constituents and calcium and phosphorus retention of commercial broiler strains

Effects of dietary calcium, available phosphorus and vitamin d on growth rate, food utilisation,... Abstract 1. The effects of different dietary concentrations of calcium (Ca), available phosphorus (AP) and vitamin D (D) on 5‐ to 16‐day growth performance, and aspects of calcium and phosphorus (P) metabolism of chickens from three commercial strains were studied in two experiments. 2. Increasing dietary Ca reduced weight gain, tibia Ca and P content and increased plasma total Ca, Ca consumption and excretion, whilst dietary Ca at 32 g/kg increased tibia Ca:P ratio, plasma ionized calcium and reduced plasma P, tibia ash, P excretion, excreta moisture and Ca retention. 3. Increasing dietary AP reduced plasma total and ionized Ca and excreta moisture and increased P consumption and excretion, plasma P and tibia ash. 4. The addition of vitamin D increased plasma total and ionized Ca, tibia Ca:P ratio and reduced plasma sodium and P concentrations. 5. Strains differed in their tibia contents of Ca and Ca:P ratios, in response to Ca, AP and vitamin D diets whilst they differed in Ca excretion and excreta moisture caused by feeding either dietary Ca or AP. 6. It was concluded that dietary Ca, AP, vitamin D and strain of broiler chickens influenced the metabolism of Ca and P and that, as a consequence, the tolerance to high dietary Ca. A lean strain of chickens tolerated high dietary calcium better than its fat counterparts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Poultry Science Taylor & Francis

Effects of dietary calcium, available phosphorus and vitamin d on growth rate, food utilisation, plasma and bone constituents and calcium and phosphorus retention of commercial broiler strains

British Poultry Science , Volume 31 (3): 16 – Sep 1, 1990

Effects of dietary calcium, available phosphorus and vitamin d on growth rate, food utilisation, plasma and bone constituents and calcium and phosphorus retention of commercial broiler strains

British Poultry Science , Volume 31 (3): 16 – Sep 1, 1990

Abstract

Abstract 1. The effects of different dietary concentrations of calcium (Ca), available phosphorus (AP) and vitamin D (D) on 5‐ to 16‐day growth performance, and aspects of calcium and phosphorus (P) metabolism of chickens from three commercial strains were studied in two experiments. 2. Increasing dietary Ca reduced weight gain, tibia Ca and P content and increased plasma total Ca, Ca consumption and excretion, whilst dietary Ca at 32 g/kg increased tibia Ca:P ratio, plasma ionized calcium and reduced plasma P, tibia ash, P excretion, excreta moisture and Ca retention. 3. Increasing dietary AP reduced plasma total and ionized Ca and excreta moisture and increased P consumption and excretion, plasma P and tibia ash. 4. The addition of vitamin D increased plasma total and ionized Ca, tibia Ca:P ratio and reduced plasma sodium and P concentrations. 5. Strains differed in their tibia contents of Ca and Ca:P ratios, in response to Ca, AP and vitamin D diets whilst they differed in Ca excretion and excreta moisture caused by feeding either dietary Ca or AP. 6. It was concluded that dietary Ca, AP, vitamin D and strain of broiler chickens influenced the metabolism of Ca and P and that, as a consequence, the tolerance to high dietary Ca. A lean strain of chickens tolerated high dietary calcium better than its fat counterparts.

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References (17)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-1799
eISSN
0007-1668
DOI
10.1080/00071669008417290
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract 1. The effects of different dietary concentrations of calcium (Ca), available phosphorus (AP) and vitamin D (D) on 5‐ to 16‐day growth performance, and aspects of calcium and phosphorus (P) metabolism of chickens from three commercial strains were studied in two experiments. 2. Increasing dietary Ca reduced weight gain, tibia Ca and P content and increased plasma total Ca, Ca consumption and excretion, whilst dietary Ca at 32 g/kg increased tibia Ca:P ratio, plasma ionized calcium and reduced plasma P, tibia ash, P excretion, excreta moisture and Ca retention. 3. Increasing dietary AP reduced plasma total and ionized Ca and excreta moisture and increased P consumption and excretion, plasma P and tibia ash. 4. The addition of vitamin D increased plasma total and ionized Ca, tibia Ca:P ratio and reduced plasma sodium and P concentrations. 5. Strains differed in their tibia contents of Ca and Ca:P ratios, in response to Ca, AP and vitamin D diets whilst they differed in Ca excretion and excreta moisture caused by feeding either dietary Ca or AP. 6. It was concluded that dietary Ca, AP, vitamin D and strain of broiler chickens influenced the metabolism of Ca and P and that, as a consequence, the tolerance to high dietary Ca. A lean strain of chickens tolerated high dietary calcium better than its fat counterparts.

Journal

British Poultry ScienceTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1990

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