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Enhancing School Engagement in At-Risk, Urban Minority Adolescents Through a School-Based, Adult Mentoring Intervention

Enhancing School Engagement in At-Risk, Urban Minority Adolescents Through a School-Based, Adult... The current study investigated whether a 5-month, adult mentoring intervention delivered by school personnel could enhance the school engagement of ninth grade urban minority adolescents. Compared to 20 at-risk students who did not receive an intervention, 20 at-risk students who were randomly assigned to mentoring exhibited significantly less decline during the first year of high school in perceived teacher support and decision making and were less likely to enter the discipline system. The effects were stronger and included sense of school belonging for participants who were “mentored as intended.” Moreover, mentee and mentor reports of relationship quality were associated with changes in mentored participants' school-related cognitions and behaviors. The findings indicate that adult mentoring may help to prevent normative declines in urban minority youths' school engagement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Child & Family Behavior Therapy Taylor & Francis

Enhancing School Engagement in At-Risk, Urban Minority Adolescents Through a School-Based, Adult Mentoring Intervention

22 pages

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References (48)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright The Haworth Press
ISSN
1545-228X
eISSN
0731-7107
DOI
10.1080/07317100802482969
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The current study investigated whether a 5-month, adult mentoring intervention delivered by school personnel could enhance the school engagement of ninth grade urban minority adolescents. Compared to 20 at-risk students who did not receive an intervention, 20 at-risk students who were randomly assigned to mentoring exhibited significantly less decline during the first year of high school in perceived teacher support and decision making and were less likely to enter the discipline system. The effects were stronger and included sense of school belonging for participants who were “mentored as intended.” Moreover, mentee and mentor reports of relationship quality were associated with changes in mentored participants' school-related cognitions and behaviors. The findings indicate that adult mentoring may help to prevent normative declines in urban minority youths' school engagement.

Journal

Child & Family Behavior TherapyTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 8, 2008

Keywords: At-risk youth; discipline referrals; high school students; mentoring; relationship quality; school belonging; teacher support

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