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Environmental Justice in Canada

Environmental Justice in Canada Local Environment Vol. 12, No. 6, 557–563, December 2007 INTRODUCTION RANDOLPH HALUZA-DELAY King’s University College, Edmonton, AB, Canada There’s an elephant in the room, former Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau used to say of the economic, cultural, political (and military) jugger- naut south of the border. Sharing a continent and similarities of culture and history with the behemoth, when the United States stirs, Canadians are affected. The heft of the United States is no less when it comes to academic scholarship. Take ‘environmental justice’. The movement, research and con- ceptualization that became labelled as ‘environmental justice’ began some three decades ago in the United States. However, while it has spread around the world, there has only recently begun to be an analysis of the differ- ent national contexts in which social and environmental dimensions intersect to create environmental injustices. In Canada, there is no discernible ‘environmental justice’ movement, and environmental justice research is limited. Numerous differences with the United States mean that American environmental justice research may not be useful in understanding intersections of justice and the environment in the Canadian context. These differences include urban geography, racial dynamics, the history of resource development, multiculturalism, social movements and social http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Local Environment Taylor & Francis

Environmental Justice in Canada

Local Environment , Volume 12 (6): 8 – Dec 1, 2007
7 pages

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References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-6711
eISSN
1354-9839
DOI
10.1080/13549830701657323
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Local Environment Vol. 12, No. 6, 557–563, December 2007 INTRODUCTION RANDOLPH HALUZA-DELAY King’s University College, Edmonton, AB, Canada There’s an elephant in the room, former Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau used to say of the economic, cultural, political (and military) jugger- naut south of the border. Sharing a continent and similarities of culture and history with the behemoth, when the United States stirs, Canadians are affected. The heft of the United States is no less when it comes to academic scholarship. Take ‘environmental justice’. The movement, research and con- ceptualization that became labelled as ‘environmental justice’ began some three decades ago in the United States. However, while it has spread around the world, there has only recently begun to be an analysis of the differ- ent national contexts in which social and environmental dimensions intersect to create environmental injustices. In Canada, there is no discernible ‘environmental justice’ movement, and environmental justice research is limited. Numerous differences with the United States mean that American environmental justice research may not be useful in understanding intersections of justice and the environment in the Canadian context. These differences include urban geography, racial dynamics, the history of resource development, multiculturalism, social movements and social

Journal

Local EnvironmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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