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Environmental political economy, technological transitions and the state

Environmental political economy, technological transitions and the state New Political Economy, Vol. 10, No. 4, December 2005 Environmental Political Economy, Technological Transitions and the State JAMES MEADOWCROFT Over the past decade environmental concerns have increasingly been integrated into the management routines of both states and corporations. This is not to suggest that global environmental problems are becoming any less acute. On the contrary: despite some real accomplishments in controlling pollution, improv- ing resource efficiency, preventing habitat destruction and protecting public health, the overall burden humans place on the global ecosphere continues to 1 2 rise. On many fronts pressures already exceed critical ecological thresholds. Patterns of greenhouse gas emission, water use, biological resource harvesting, chemical release and soil degradation appear unsustainable. And yet environ- mental issues are more manifest in societal discourse, and better anchored institutionally, than ever before. Since the mid 1990s there has been an impressive growth in the literature of environmental political economy. This article will reflect on some recent develop- ments in this field. After a brief overview, the bulk of the analysis will focus on one of the more dynamic areas of contemporary scholarship – the debate over technological system change and transition management. This area is of particular interest because the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Political Economy Taylor & Francis

Environmental political economy, technological transitions and the state

New Political Economy , Volume 10 (4): 20 – Dec 1, 2005
20 pages

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References (42)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9923
eISSN
1356-3467
DOI
10.1080/13563460500344419
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

New Political Economy, Vol. 10, No. 4, December 2005 Environmental Political Economy, Technological Transitions and the State JAMES MEADOWCROFT Over the past decade environmental concerns have increasingly been integrated into the management routines of both states and corporations. This is not to suggest that global environmental problems are becoming any less acute. On the contrary: despite some real accomplishments in controlling pollution, improv- ing resource efficiency, preventing habitat destruction and protecting public health, the overall burden humans place on the global ecosphere continues to 1 2 rise. On many fronts pressures already exceed critical ecological thresholds. Patterns of greenhouse gas emission, water use, biological resource harvesting, chemical release and soil degradation appear unsustainable. And yet environ- mental issues are more manifest in societal discourse, and better anchored institutionally, than ever before. Since the mid 1990s there has been an impressive growth in the literature of environmental political economy. This article will reflect on some recent develop- ments in this field. After a brief overview, the bulk of the analysis will focus on one of the more dynamic areas of contemporary scholarship – the debate over technological system change and transition management. This area is of particular interest because the

Journal

New Political EconomyTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2005

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