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Epidemic disease and national security

Epidemic disease and national security SUSAN PETERSON HE UNITED NATIONS Security Council’s January 2000 meeting on AIDS marked the first time in the institution’s history that it addressed a health issue. In his speech to the Security Council, then-vice president Al Gore called for a “new, more expansive definition” of security that includes emerging and reemerging infectious diseases (IDs) like acquired immune defi- ciency syndrome (AIDS). That same month, a National Intelligence Estimate on the security implications of global infectious diseases concluded that “these diseases will endanger U.S. citizenry at home and abroad, threaten U.S. armed forces deployed overseas, and exacerbate social and political instability in key Susan Peterson is associate professor at the College of William & Mary. The author thanks Dave Brown, Anthony DeVassy, Jason Fabricante, Joe MacAvoy, and Karen Willmer for research assistance, and the College of William and Mary for financial support. She also thanks Ben Frankel, Sean Lynn-Jones, Michael Tierney, several anonymous reviewers and, especially, Andrew Cortell, Jonathan Mercer, and Heather Scully for their careful readings and thoughtful comments. 1. The White House, Office of the Vice President, “Remarks prepared for delivery by Vice President Al Gore, United Nations Security Council Opening Session,” 10 January 2000, www.whitehouse.gov/ONAP/pub/vp_sc2.html (8 July http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Security Studies Taylor & Francis

Epidemic disease and national security

Security Studies , Volume 12 (2): 39 – Dec 1, 2002
39 pages

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References (25)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Frank Cass & Co. Ltd.
ISSN
1556-1852
eISSN
0963-6412
DOI
10.1080/09636410212120009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SUSAN PETERSON HE UNITED NATIONS Security Council’s January 2000 meeting on AIDS marked the first time in the institution’s history that it addressed a health issue. In his speech to the Security Council, then-vice president Al Gore called for a “new, more expansive definition” of security that includes emerging and reemerging infectious diseases (IDs) like acquired immune defi- ciency syndrome (AIDS). That same month, a National Intelligence Estimate on the security implications of global infectious diseases concluded that “these diseases will endanger U.S. citizenry at home and abroad, threaten U.S. armed forces deployed overseas, and exacerbate social and political instability in key Susan Peterson is associate professor at the College of William & Mary. The author thanks Dave Brown, Anthony DeVassy, Jason Fabricante, Joe MacAvoy, and Karen Willmer for research assistance, and the College of William and Mary for financial support. She also thanks Ben Frankel, Sean Lynn-Jones, Michael Tierney, several anonymous reviewers and, especially, Andrew Cortell, Jonathan Mercer, and Heather Scully for their careful readings and thoughtful comments. 1. The White House, Office of the Vice President, “Remarks prepared for delivery by Vice President Al Gore, United Nations Security Council Opening Session,” 10 January 2000, www.whitehouse.gov/ONAP/pub/vp_sc2.html (8 July

Journal

Security StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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