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Estimating the carbon footprint of Australian tourism

Estimating the carbon footprint of Australian tourism This paper explores the issues in estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the tourism industry and related activity in Australia. The scope of tourism consists of the economic activities defined as “tourism characteristic” and “tourism connected” as defined in the Australian Tourism Satellite Account (TSA). Two approaches are employed and contrasted – a “production approach” and an “expenditure approach”. Depending on the approach, tourism contributes between 3.9% and 5.3% of total industry GHG in Australia. The rationale for each approach is explained. The GHG emissions have been estimated for 2003–2004, the latest year for which detailed industry GHG emissions data are available in a form suitable for this type of analysis. Tourism's GHG emissions are compared with other industries in the Australian economy. The policy implications of the results are discussed. It should be possible to adopt a broadly similar method for any destination with TSA – enabling tourism stakeholders to play an informed role in assessing appropriate and effective climate change mitigation strategies for their destination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Sustainable Tourism Taylor & Francis

Estimating the carbon footprint of Australian tourism

22 pages

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References (35)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1747-7646
eISSN
0966-9582
DOI
10.1080/09669580903513061
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper explores the issues in estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the tourism industry and related activity in Australia. The scope of tourism consists of the economic activities defined as “tourism characteristic” and “tourism connected” as defined in the Australian Tourism Satellite Account (TSA). Two approaches are employed and contrasted – a “production approach” and an “expenditure approach”. Depending on the approach, tourism contributes between 3.9% and 5.3% of total industry GHG in Australia. The rationale for each approach is explained. The GHG emissions have been estimated for 2003–2004, the latest year for which detailed industry GHG emissions data are available in a form suitable for this type of analysis. Tourism's GHG emissions are compared with other industries in the Australian economy. The policy implications of the results are discussed. It should be possible to adopt a broadly similar method for any destination with TSA – enabling tourism stakeholders to play an informed role in assessing appropriate and effective climate change mitigation strategies for their destination.

Journal

Journal of Sustainable TourismTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2010

Keywords: carbon sinks; climate change; ecological footprint; emissions; environment; socioeconomic impacts

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