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Evaluating the Use of Landsat 30m Enhanced Thematic Mapper to Monitor Vegetation Cover in Shrub‐Steppe Environments

Evaluating the Use of Landsat 30m Enhanced Thematic Mapper to Monitor Vegetation Cover in... Abstract Many land‐management agencies are caught between decreased budgets and increasing public interest. Furthermore, semi‐arid landscapes are sensitive to management prescriptions and use, and require a significant amount of monitoring in order to assess vegetation productivity and health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) Imagery to monitor seasonal vegetation cover in a shrub‐steppe ecosystem. The study area, managed by The Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, consists of a shrub‐steppe environment in south‐central Utah. Biotic (tree, shrub, grass, and forbs) and abotic (slope, aspect, elevation, landform type, and slope shape) data were collected during the 2001 growing season and compared with three dates of Landsat ETM satellite imagery. The relationships between remotely sensed parameters, photosynthetically active ground cover and bare ground were significant. Stepwise linear regression for total vegetation cover identified the ETM bands 2, 4, and 5 with NDVI as the strongest predictor variables (r2 = 0.86, p < 0.01). Combined predictor values for bare ground using ETM bands 3, 4, 5, and 7 with NDVI had a stronger relationship (r2 = 0.92, p < .01). Correlations between percent vegetation cover estimates versus ETM individual reflective bands and NDVI showed little relationship between vegetation cover and the NIR (band 4) but a strong relationship with NDVI for this semi‐arid landscape. Remote sensing information may be the key for public and private land mangers to make optimal economic and environmental decisions regarding use of state, public, and private rangelands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geocarto International Taylor & Francis

Evaluating the Use of Landsat 30m Enhanced Thematic Mapper to Monitor Vegetation Cover in Shrub‐Steppe Environments

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References (33)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1752-0762
eISSN
1010-6049
DOI
10.1080/10106040408542305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Many land‐management agencies are caught between decreased budgets and increasing public interest. Furthermore, semi‐arid landscapes are sensitive to management prescriptions and use, and require a significant amount of monitoring in order to assess vegetation productivity and health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) Imagery to monitor seasonal vegetation cover in a shrub‐steppe ecosystem. The study area, managed by The Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, consists of a shrub‐steppe environment in south‐central Utah. Biotic (tree, shrub, grass, and forbs) and abotic (slope, aspect, elevation, landform type, and slope shape) data were collected during the 2001 growing season and compared with three dates of Landsat ETM satellite imagery. The relationships between remotely sensed parameters, photosynthetically active ground cover and bare ground were significant. Stepwise linear regression for total vegetation cover identified the ETM bands 2, 4, and 5 with NDVI as the strongest predictor variables (r2 = 0.86, p < 0.01). Combined predictor values for bare ground using ETM bands 3, 4, 5, and 7 with NDVI had a stronger relationship (r2 = 0.92, p < .01). Correlations between percent vegetation cover estimates versus ETM individual reflective bands and NDVI showed little relationship between vegetation cover and the NIR (band 4) but a strong relationship with NDVI for this semi‐arid landscape. Remote sensing information may be the key for public and private land mangers to make optimal economic and environmental decisions regarding use of state, public, and private rangelands.

Journal

Geocarto InternationalTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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