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Fractures in Children

Fractures in Children ediatrics IN GENERAL PRACTICE WALTER P. BLOUNT* Milwaukee Children's Hospital, Milwaukee FRACTURES in children are different from deformities. The degree of correctability de­ those in adults. The principles of treatment pends on three variables: are simple. Alignment is the chief require­ 1. The age of the child. ment. The fracture should not be grossly angu­ 2. The distance of the fracture from the lated nor rotated. Accurate apposition and end of the bone. normal length are not necessary in children. 3. The amount of angulation. ln most cases, excellent results are obtained The younger the child and the nearer the frac­ by simple traction or closed reduction and a ture to the end of the bone, the greater the cast. The exceptions which often require open deformity that is acceptable. reduction are three relatively common frac­ Third, there may be disastrous angulation tures at the elbow and a few rare joint frac­ and shortening from injury to an epiphysial tures. Elsewhere, an open reduction in a child plate. The younger the child the worse the is diffi.cult to justify. deformity. In children, bones are not only living but Fractures oj the Femur growing. Continued growth after the fracture is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Postgraduate Medicine Taylor & Francis

Fractures in Children

Postgraduate Medicine , Volume 16 (3): 8 – Sep 1, 1954

Fractures in Children

Postgraduate Medicine , Volume 16 (3): 8 – Sep 1, 1954

Abstract

ediatrics IN GENERAL PRACTICE WALTER P. BLOUNT* Milwaukee Children's Hospital, Milwaukee FRACTURES in children are different from deformities. The degree of correctability de­ those in adults. The principles of treatment pends on three variables: are simple. Alignment is the chief require­ 1. The age of the child. ment. The fracture should not be grossly angu­ 2. The distance of the fracture from the lated nor rotated. Accurate apposition and end of the bone. normal length are not necessary in children. 3. The amount of angulation. ln most cases, excellent results are obtained The younger the child and the nearer the frac­ by simple traction or closed reduction and a ture to the end of the bone, the greater the cast. The exceptions which often require open deformity that is acceptable. reduction are three relatively common frac­ Third, there may be disastrous angulation tures at the elbow and a few rare joint frac­ and shortening from injury to an epiphysial tures. Elsewhere, an open reduction in a child plate. The younger the child the worse the is diffi.cult to justify. deformity. In children, bones are not only living but Fractures oj the Femur growing. Continued growth after the fracture is

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References (9)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1954 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1941-9260
DOI
10.1080/00325481.1954.11711663
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ediatrics IN GENERAL PRACTICE WALTER P. BLOUNT* Milwaukee Children's Hospital, Milwaukee FRACTURES in children are different from deformities. The degree of correctability de­ those in adults. The principles of treatment pends on three variables: are simple. Alignment is the chief require­ 1. The age of the child. ment. The fracture should not be grossly angu­ 2. The distance of the fracture from the lated nor rotated. Accurate apposition and end of the bone. normal length are not necessary in children. 3. The amount of angulation. ln most cases, excellent results are obtained The younger the child and the nearer the frac­ by simple traction or closed reduction and a ture to the end of the bone, the greater the cast. The exceptions which often require open deformity that is acceptable. reduction are three relatively common frac­ Third, there may be disastrous angulation tures at the elbow and a few rare joint frac­ and shortening from injury to an epiphysial tures. Elsewhere, an open reduction in a child plate. The younger the child the worse the is diffi.cult to justify. deformity. In children, bones are not only living but Fractures oj the Femur growing. Continued growth after the fracture is

Journal

Postgraduate MedicineTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1954

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