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From Solidarity to Fluidarity: Social movements beyond 'collective identity'--the case of globalization conflicts

From Solidarity to Fluidarity: Social movements beyond 'collective identity'--the case... Over the 1980s 'collective identity' became established as one of the orthodoxies of the sociology of social movements. This paper considers this development, and argues that 'collective identity' does not allow a conceptualization and exploration of critical dimensions of action and identity emerging in contemporary globalization conflicts. Drawing on fieldwork undertaken with Direct Action groups in Australia and the USA, this paper considers (i) the role of affinity groups, (ii) the question of representation, (iii) network culture and fluidarity, and (iv) the narrative structure of action. In the light of these, the paper critiques the 'collective identity' model, while also suggesting limits to the 'personalized commitment' thesis (Lichterman, The Search for Political Community , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996) advanced in relation to Green activists. The paper argues in the context of network societies, the analysis of processes of action and identity within contemporary social movements must shift from 'solidarity' to one of 'fluidarity', and from 'collective identity' to one of 'public experience of self'. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Movement Studies Taylor & Francis

From Solidarity to Fluidarity: Social movements beyond 'collective identity'--the case of globalization conflicts

Social Movement Studies , Volume 1 (2): 20 – Oct 1, 2002
20 pages

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References (52)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1474-2829
eISSN
1474-2837
DOI
10.1080/1474283022000010637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Over the 1980s 'collective identity' became established as one of the orthodoxies of the sociology of social movements. This paper considers this development, and argues that 'collective identity' does not allow a conceptualization and exploration of critical dimensions of action and identity emerging in contemporary globalization conflicts. Drawing on fieldwork undertaken with Direct Action groups in Australia and the USA, this paper considers (i) the role of affinity groups, (ii) the question of representation, (iii) network culture and fluidarity, and (iv) the narrative structure of action. In the light of these, the paper critiques the 'collective identity' model, while also suggesting limits to the 'personalized commitment' thesis (Lichterman, The Search for Political Community , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996) advanced in relation to Green activists. The paper argues in the context of network societies, the analysis of processes of action and identity within contemporary social movements must shift from 'solidarity' to one of 'fluidarity', and from 'collective identity' to one of 'public experience of self'.

Journal

Social Movement StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2002

Keywords: Collective Identity; Social Movements; Direct Action; Globalization Conflicts; Personalized Commitment; Network Capitalism; Fluidarity

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