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From wasteland to waste site: the role of discourse in nuclear power's environmental injustices

From wasteland to waste site: the role of discourse in nuclear power's environmental injustices The purpose of this essay is twofold. First, I examine interdisciplinary literature to reveal the environmental injustices associated with the front and back ends of nuclear power production in the USA – Uranium mining and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) storage. Second, I argue that the injustices associated with nuclear power are upheld, in part, through discourse. This essay examines how the term “wasteland” is invoked in relation to HLW waste storage in the USA and contributes to the discursive formation of nuclear colonialism. Examination of this discourse not only contributes to current literature on nuclear colonialism but also to environmental justice research by arguing for the importance of examining the discursive aspects of environmental injustices. Further, the essay adds to current scholarship in energy justice by highlighting the environmental injustices associated with nuclear power. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Local Environment Taylor & Francis

From wasteland to waste site: the role of discourse in nuclear power's environmental injustices

Local Environment , Volume 14 (10): 21 – Nov 1, 2009
21 pages

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References (129)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-6711
eISSN
1354-9839
DOI
10.1080/13549830903244409
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this essay is twofold. First, I examine interdisciplinary literature to reveal the environmental injustices associated with the front and back ends of nuclear power production in the USA – Uranium mining and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) storage. Second, I argue that the injustices associated with nuclear power are upheld, in part, through discourse. This essay examines how the term “wasteland” is invoked in relation to HLW waste storage in the USA and contributes to the discursive formation of nuclear colonialism. Examination of this discourse not only contributes to current literature on nuclear colonialism but also to environmental justice research by arguing for the importance of examining the discursive aspects of environmental injustices. Further, the essay adds to current scholarship in energy justice by highlighting the environmental injustices associated with nuclear power.

Journal

Local EnvironmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2009

Keywords: environmental justice; nuclear power; nuclear waste; nuclear colonialism; wasteland; discursive formations

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