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Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Further Results

Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Further Results Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Further Resu Its William H. Greene In the article “Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges,” Burnett (1997) proposes a model for explaining the presence of a gender economics course in a liberal arts college’s course offerings. The model is based on covari- ates such as the academic reputation of the college, whether the college has a reli- gious affiliation, the region of the country, and other variables relating to the number of women on the faculty of the college and in the economics department. Two aspects of her model are interesting: (1) the response variable of interest, presence of a gender economics course, is a binary variable, and (2) one of the important covariates, presence of a women’s studies program, is likely to be jointly determined with the gender economics indicator and is a binary variable as well. The first of these mandates the use of an appropriate technique for bina- ry choice modeling, such as a probit model. The second calls for something resembling a simultaneous equations treatment, which greatly complicates the analysis. The major difficulty with this treatment is that this is a nonlinear model, for which familiar simultaneous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Economic Education Taylor & Francis

Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Further Results

The Journal of Economic Education , Volume 29 (4): 10 – Jan 1, 1998
10 pages

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References (5)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2152-4068
eISSN
0022-0485
DOI
10.1080/00220489809595921
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Further Resu Its William H. Greene In the article “Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges,” Burnett (1997) proposes a model for explaining the presence of a gender economics course in a liberal arts college’s course offerings. The model is based on covari- ates such as the academic reputation of the college, whether the college has a reli- gious affiliation, the region of the country, and other variables relating to the number of women on the faculty of the college and in the economics department. Two aspects of her model are interesting: (1) the response variable of interest, presence of a gender economics course, is a binary variable, and (2) one of the important covariates, presence of a women’s studies program, is likely to be jointly determined with the gender economics indicator and is a binary variable as well. The first of these mandates the use of an appropriate technique for bina- ry choice modeling, such as a probit model. The second calls for something resembling a simultaneous equations treatment, which greatly complicates the analysis. The major difficulty with this treatment is that this is a nonlinear model, for which familiar simultaneous

Journal

The Journal of Economic EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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