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General deterrent effects of police patrol in crime “hot spots”: A randomized, controlled trial*

General deterrent effects of police patrol in crime “hot spots”: A randomized, controlled trial* Many criminologists doubt that the dosage of uniformed police patrol causes any measurable difference in crime. This article reports a one-year randomized trial in Minneapolis of increases in patrol dosage at 55 of 110 crime “hot spots,” monitored by 7,542 hours of systematic observations. The experimental group received, on average, twice as much observed patrol presence, although the ratio displayed wide seasonal fluctuation. Reductions in total crime calls ranged from 6 percent to 13 percent. Observed disorder was only half as prevalent in experimental as in control hot spots. We conclude that substantial increases in police patrol presence can indeed cause modest reductions in crime and more impressive reductions in disorder within high crime locations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Justice Quarterly Taylor & Francis

General deterrent effects of police patrol in crime “hot spots”: A randomized, controlled trial*

Justice Quarterly , Volume 12 (4): 24 – Dec 1, 1995

General deterrent effects of police patrol in crime “hot spots”: A randomized, controlled trial*

Justice Quarterly , Volume 12 (4): 24 – Dec 1, 1995

Abstract

Many criminologists doubt that the dosage of uniformed police patrol causes any measurable difference in crime. This article reports a one-year randomized trial in Minneapolis of increases in patrol dosage at 55 of 110 crime “hot spots,” monitored by 7,542 hours of systematic observations. The experimental group received, on average, twice as much observed patrol presence, although the ratio displayed wide seasonal fluctuation. Reductions in total crime calls ranged from 6 percent to 13 percent. Observed disorder was only half as prevalent in experimental as in control hot spots. We conclude that substantial increases in police patrol presence can indeed cause modest reductions in crime and more impressive reductions in disorder within high crime locations.

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References (23)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
ISSN
1745-9109
eISSN
0741-8825
DOI
10.1080/07418829500096221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many criminologists doubt that the dosage of uniformed police patrol causes any measurable difference in crime. This article reports a one-year randomized trial in Minneapolis of increases in patrol dosage at 55 of 110 crime “hot spots,” monitored by 7,542 hours of systematic observations. The experimental group received, on average, twice as much observed patrol presence, although the ratio displayed wide seasonal fluctuation. Reductions in total crime calls ranged from 6 percent to 13 percent. Observed disorder was only half as prevalent in experimental as in control hot spots. We conclude that substantial increases in police patrol presence can indeed cause modest reductions in crime and more impressive reductions in disorder within high crime locations.

Journal

Justice QuarterlyTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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