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Global Governance and the Politics of Crisis

Global Governance and the Politics of Crisis The notion of global governance has always been intimately linked to that of crisis. In recent crisis episodes the architecture of global governance has been held responsible for weak or ineffective regulatory mechanisms that failed to either prevent systemic crises or to at least give an “early warning” of impending disasters, while in other episodes global governance institutions have been blamed for poor crisis responses and management. Global governance institutions have also been blamed for failing to expand the scope of their jurisdictions to incorporate new systemic risks and new market players, as well as for their inability to adapt to new political, economic, social and environmental challenges. The framing article for this special issue on “Global Governance in Crisis” examines four key features of global governance in the context of the global financial crisis: (1) the dynamic role played by ideas in making global governance “hang together” during periods of crisis; (2) how crisis serves as a driver of change in global governance (and why it sometimes does not); (3) how ubiquitous the global financial crisis was as an event in world politics; and (4) the conditions that constitute an event as a crisis. Due to the complexity and institutional “stickiness” of the contemporary architecture of global governance, the article concludes that a far-reaching overhaul and structural reforms in global governance processes is both costly and improbable in the short-term. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Society Taylor & Francis

Global Governance and the Politics of Crisis

Global Society , Volume 26 (1): 15 – Jan 1, 2012
15 pages

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References (1)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright University of Kent
ISSN
1469-798X
eISSN
1360-0826
DOI
10.1080/13600826.2011.629992
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The notion of global governance has always been intimately linked to that of crisis. In recent crisis episodes the architecture of global governance has been held responsible for weak or ineffective regulatory mechanisms that failed to either prevent systemic crises or to at least give an “early warning” of impending disasters, while in other episodes global governance institutions have been blamed for poor crisis responses and management. Global governance institutions have also been blamed for failing to expand the scope of their jurisdictions to incorporate new systemic risks and new market players, as well as for their inability to adapt to new political, economic, social and environmental challenges. The framing article for this special issue on “Global Governance in Crisis” examines four key features of global governance in the context of the global financial crisis: (1) the dynamic role played by ideas in making global governance “hang together” during periods of crisis; (2) how crisis serves as a driver of change in global governance (and why it sometimes does not); (3) how ubiquitous the global financial crisis was as an event in world politics; and (4) the conditions that constitute an event as a crisis. Due to the complexity and institutional “stickiness” of the contemporary architecture of global governance, the article concludes that a far-reaching overhaul and structural reforms in global governance processes is both costly and improbable in the short-term.

Journal

Global SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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