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“Habermasville”: Police–Community Intersections and Communicative Rationality

“Habermasville”: Police–Community Intersections and Communicative Rationality Police–community relations in the United States are seeing a crisis of trust and legitimacy. Minorities disproportionally experience police contact, and recent shootings of unarmed persons raise concerns about whether minority communities have equal protection of the law. This paper uses Jürgen Habermas’s theory of communicative rationality to examine this distrust. The argument is that Habermas’s theory positively informs understanding of police–community relations in that distrust is caused by lack of communicative acts in favor of strategic acts emphasizing crime control that maintains unjust systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Administrative Theory & Praxis Taylor & Francis

“Habermasville”: Police–Community Intersections and Communicative Rationality

Administrative Theory & Praxis , Volume 42 (4): 16 – Oct 1, 2020

“Habermasville”: Police–Community Intersections and Communicative Rationality

Administrative Theory & Praxis , Volume 42 (4): 16 – Oct 1, 2020

Abstract

Police–community relations in the United States are seeing a crisis of trust and legitimacy. Minorities disproportionally experience police contact, and recent shootings of unarmed persons raise concerns about whether minority communities have equal protection of the law. This paper uses Jürgen Habermas’s theory of communicative rationality to examine this distrust. The argument is that Habermas’s theory positively informs understanding of police–community relations in that distrust is caused by lack of communicative acts in favor of strategic acts emphasizing crime control that maintains unjust systems.

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References (38)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Public Administration Theory Network
ISSN
1949-0461
eISSN
1084-1806
DOI
10.1080/10841806.2019.1678350
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Police–community relations in the United States are seeing a crisis of trust and legitimacy. Minorities disproportionally experience police contact, and recent shootings of unarmed persons raise concerns about whether minority communities have equal protection of the law. This paper uses Jürgen Habermas’s theory of communicative rationality to examine this distrust. The argument is that Habermas’s theory positively informs understanding of police–community relations in that distrust is caused by lack of communicative acts in favor of strategic acts emphasizing crime control that maintains unjust systems.

Journal

Administrative Theory & PraxisTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2020

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