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Hematologic Recovery and Survival of Lymphoma Patients After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation: Comparison of Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells

Hematologic Recovery and Survival of Lymphoma Patients After Autologous Stem-Cell... Autologous stem-cell transplantation is widely used as part of the treatment of poor prognosis lymphoma patients. Since 1986, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) mobilized by chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic growth factors have progressively been used instead of autologous bone marrow (BM) cells. Toxicity, engraftment and long-term outcome were compared in a population of relapsing or refractory lymphoma patients given high-dose therapy. During 1986 to 1993, 150 patients with refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (n = 93) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 57) received intensive therapy followed by the reinjection of BM (n = 72) or PBPC (n = 78). PBPC were collected by aphereses during the phase of hematologic recovery after mobilization by chemotherapy alone (n = 36) or associated with GCSF (n = 43). Conditioning regimens included chemotherapy alone in 77%, associated with total body irradiation (TBI) in 23%. After stem-cell reinfusion, 55% of the PBPC group received GCSF versus 24% in the BM group. Results show that the median time to neutrophil counts >500/μ1 and platelets >50, 000/μ1 was significantly shorter in the PBPC than the BM group, respectively 13 versus 23 days and 18 versus 26 days (P < 0.05). This difference remained significant (P < 0.05) when patients were stratified according to the administration or not of GCSF after transplantation. PBPC grafting after high-dose therapy was associated with a median reduction of the hospital stay of 10 days. The majority of patients (90%) maintained normal blood counts at 3 months, and no secondary graft failure was observed in either group. The use of TBI in the conditioning regimen was the only significant factor affecting long-term hematologic recovery. For relapsing patients with histologically aggressive lymphomas, overall survival and failure-free survival were similar in both groups. In conclusion, PBPC transplantation is a safe procedure associated with improvement of hematopoietic recovery and a shortened hospital stay. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leukemia & Lymphoma Taylor & Francis

Hematologic Recovery and Survival of Lymphoma Patients After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation: Comparison of Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells

Hematologic Recovery and Survival of Lymphoma Patients After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation: Comparison of Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells

Leukemia & Lymphoma , Volume 22 (5-6): 8 – Jan 1, 1996

Abstract

Autologous stem-cell transplantation is widely used as part of the treatment of poor prognosis lymphoma patients. Since 1986, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) mobilized by chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic growth factors have progressively been used instead of autologous bone marrow (BM) cells. Toxicity, engraftment and long-term outcome were compared in a population of relapsing or refractory lymphoma patients given high-dose therapy. During 1986 to 1993, 150 patients with refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (n = 93) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 57) received intensive therapy followed by the reinjection of BM (n = 72) or PBPC (n = 78). PBPC were collected by aphereses during the phase of hematologic recovery after mobilization by chemotherapy alone (n = 36) or associated with GCSF (n = 43). Conditioning regimens included chemotherapy alone in 77%, associated with total body irradiation (TBI) in 23%. After stem-cell reinfusion, 55% of the PBPC group received GCSF versus 24% in the BM group. Results show that the median time to neutrophil counts >500/μ1 and platelets >50, 000/μ1 was significantly shorter in the PBPC than the BM group, respectively 13 versus 23 days and 18 versus 26 days (P < 0.05). This difference remained significant (P < 0.05) when patients were stratified according to the administration or not of GCSF after transplantation. PBPC grafting after high-dose therapy was associated with a median reduction of the hospital stay of 10 days. The majority of patients (90%) maintained normal blood counts at 3 months, and no secondary graft failure was observed in either group. The use of TBI in the conditioning regimen was the only significant factor affecting long-term hematologic recovery. For relapsing patients with histologically aggressive lymphomas, overall survival and failure-free survival were similar in both groups. In conclusion, PBPC transplantation is a safe procedure associated with improvement of hematopoietic recovery and a shortened hospital stay.

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References (42)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1996 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1029-2403
eISSN
1042-8194
DOI
10.3109/10428199609054783
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Autologous stem-cell transplantation is widely used as part of the treatment of poor prognosis lymphoma patients. Since 1986, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) mobilized by chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic growth factors have progressively been used instead of autologous bone marrow (BM) cells. Toxicity, engraftment and long-term outcome were compared in a population of relapsing or refractory lymphoma patients given high-dose therapy. During 1986 to 1993, 150 patients with refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (n = 93) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 57) received intensive therapy followed by the reinjection of BM (n = 72) or PBPC (n = 78). PBPC were collected by aphereses during the phase of hematologic recovery after mobilization by chemotherapy alone (n = 36) or associated with GCSF (n = 43). Conditioning regimens included chemotherapy alone in 77%, associated with total body irradiation (TBI) in 23%. After stem-cell reinfusion, 55% of the PBPC group received GCSF versus 24% in the BM group. Results show that the median time to neutrophil counts >500/μ1 and platelets >50, 000/μ1 was significantly shorter in the PBPC than the BM group, respectively 13 versus 23 days and 18 versus 26 days (P < 0.05). This difference remained significant (P < 0.05) when patients were stratified according to the administration or not of GCSF after transplantation. PBPC grafting after high-dose therapy was associated with a median reduction of the hospital stay of 10 days. The majority of patients (90%) maintained normal blood counts at 3 months, and no secondary graft failure was observed in either group. The use of TBI in the conditioning regimen was the only significant factor affecting long-term hematologic recovery. For relapsing patients with histologically aggressive lymphomas, overall survival and failure-free survival were similar in both groups. In conclusion, PBPC transplantation is a safe procedure associated with improvement of hematopoietic recovery and a shortened hospital stay.

Journal

Leukemia & LymphomaTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1996

Keywords: Bone marrow transplantation; lymphoma; peripheral stem-cell; transplantation; hematogic recovery

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