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Heritage, Tourism, and the Commodification of Religion

Heritage, Tourism, and the Commodification of Religion TOURISM RECREATION RESEARCH VOL. 28(3), 2003:99-104 Research Note Daniel H. Olsen PhD Candidate at the Department of Geography, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Ontario, Canada. email: dh2olsen@fes.uwaterloo.ca Heritage has long been a prime lure for tourists Many government officials and tourism agendes view (Lowenthal1996). However, there has been much debate tourism as a way to save struggling economies. In order to in recent years over what exactly constitutes heritage, as it maximize the potential international capital available has become a broad and interdisciplinary word. While most through tourism, countries, regions, and localities are people equate heritage with an individual's inheritance pressured into commodifying their unique architecture, from a deceased ancestor, the term has been expanded in culture, histories, and natural environments to attract recent decades to include definitions ranging from a tourists and satisfy their demands for both new and synonym for any relic of the past to all cultural and artistic unfamiliar experiences (Britton 1991; Young 1999). Heritage productivity produced in the past or present; from a major is one of the resources that is regularly transformed for commerdal activity that is based on selling goods and tourism purposes, because of its flexible nature and its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tourism Recreation Research Taylor & Francis

Heritage, Tourism, and the Commodification of Religion

Tourism Recreation Research , Volume 28 (3): 6 – Jan 1, 2003
6 pages

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References (63)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2003 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2320-0308
eISSN
0250-8281
DOI
10.1080/02508281.2003.11081422
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TOURISM RECREATION RESEARCH VOL. 28(3), 2003:99-104 Research Note Daniel H. Olsen PhD Candidate at the Department of Geography, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Ontario, Canada. email: dh2olsen@fes.uwaterloo.ca Heritage has long been a prime lure for tourists Many government officials and tourism agendes view (Lowenthal1996). However, there has been much debate tourism as a way to save struggling economies. In order to in recent years over what exactly constitutes heritage, as it maximize the potential international capital available has become a broad and interdisciplinary word. While most through tourism, countries, regions, and localities are people equate heritage with an individual's inheritance pressured into commodifying their unique architecture, from a deceased ancestor, the term has been expanded in culture, histories, and natural environments to attract recent decades to include definitions ranging from a tourists and satisfy their demands for both new and synonym for any relic of the past to all cultural and artistic unfamiliar experiences (Britton 1991; Young 1999). Heritage productivity produced in the past or present; from a major is one of the resources that is regularly transformed for commerdal activity that is based on selling goods and tourism purposes, because of its flexible nature and its

Journal

Tourism Recreation ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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