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Hindu Nation and its Queers: Caste, Islamophobia, and De/coloniality in India

Hindu Nation and its Queers: Caste, Islamophobia, and De/coloniality in India The 2018 Indian Supreme Court judgement decriminalizing homosexuality has been marked as a “decolonial act.” Section 377, which criminalized homosexuality, was a colonial law introduced by the British in India, which the postcolonial state maintained till 2018. The judgement may be “decolonial” in intent, but there are other simultaneous processes at play which are not so decolonial in praxis; this essay argues these processes are colonialism, brahminical supremacy, and Islamophobia. Caste-based violence is integral to Hinduism and intertwined with other matrices of oppression, making caste foundational to any claims of Hinduism as queer, trans and gender nonconforming friendly. Studying recent Hindu nationalist responses in favour of decriminalization of homosexuality in India, this essay traces how the Hindu Right deploys queerness to propagate its Islamophobic, casteist, and homohindunationalist agendas. The essay argues decolonizing the law, state, and sexuality would also mean annihilating caste and brahminical structures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies Taylor & Francis

Hindu Nation and its Queers: Caste, Islamophobia, and De/coloniality in India

Hindu Nation and its Queers: Caste, Islamophobia, and De/coloniality in India


Abstract

The 2018 Indian Supreme Court judgement decriminalizing homosexuality has been marked as a “decolonial act.” Section 377, which criminalized homosexuality, was a colonial law introduced by the British in India, which the postcolonial state maintained till 2018. The judgement may be “decolonial” in intent, but there are other simultaneous processes at play which are not so decolonial in praxis; this essay argues these processes are colonialism, brahminical supremacy, and Islamophobia. Caste-based violence is integral to Hinduism and intertwined with other matrices of oppression, making caste foundational to any claims of Hinduism as queer, trans and gender nonconforming friendly. Studying recent Hindu nationalist responses in favour of decriminalization of homosexuality in India, this essay traces how the Hindu Right deploys queerness to propagate its Islamophobic, casteist, and homohindunationalist agendas. The essay argues decolonizing the law, state, and sexuality would also mean annihilating caste and brahminical structures.

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References (90)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1469-929X
eISSN
1369-801X
DOI
10.1080/1369801X.2020.1749709
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The 2018 Indian Supreme Court judgement decriminalizing homosexuality has been marked as a “decolonial act.” Section 377, which criminalized homosexuality, was a colonial law introduced by the British in India, which the postcolonial state maintained till 2018. The judgement may be “decolonial” in intent, but there are other simultaneous processes at play which are not so decolonial in praxis; this essay argues these processes are colonialism, brahminical supremacy, and Islamophobia. Caste-based violence is integral to Hinduism and intertwined with other matrices of oppression, making caste foundational to any claims of Hinduism as queer, trans and gender nonconforming friendly. Studying recent Hindu nationalist responses in favour of decriminalization of homosexuality in India, this essay traces how the Hindu Right deploys queerness to propagate its Islamophobic, casteist, and homohindunationalist agendas. The essay argues decolonizing the law, state, and sexuality would also mean annihilating caste and brahminical structures.

Journal

Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: May 18, 2020

Keywords: caste; de/coloniality; Hindu nationalism; Islamophobia; sexuality

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