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I. Only One World: An Awakening

I. Only One World: An Awakening A Special Report What Happened at Stockholm The United Nations Conference on the Human Environment at Stockholm last June was an event of historic proportions. lt marked the beginning of a transition in the attitudes of most of the human race toward the future uses of the environment. Despite ideological, political, economic or religious differences, the delegates of 114 nations at the Conference were able to agree on an Action Plan and a Declaration of Principles based on the common realization that the Earth is a closed, ecological system and man continues to modify it only at his peril. In the articles, addresses and summaries which follow in this Special Report, we present a descriptive review of what happened at Stockholm. And we do so at some length, for Stock­ holm, we believe, represents a new plateau in man's awareness of his environment and of his relation to it. Contributors to the Special Report are R. Stephen Berry, professor of chemistry at the Uni­ versity of Chicago and member of our Editorial Board, Paul R. Ehrlich and Staff members Frances Gendlin and Sally Jacobsen who covered both the governmental and nongovernmental the Conference. activities at 11. A Call to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Taylor & Francis

I. Only One World: An Awakening

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , Volume 28 (7): 5 – Sep 1, 1972

I. Only One World: An Awakening

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , Volume 28 (7): 5 – Sep 1, 1972

Abstract

A Special Report What Happened at Stockholm The United Nations Conference on the Human Environment at Stockholm last June was an event of historic proportions. lt marked the beginning of a transition in the attitudes of most of the human race toward the future uses of the environment. Despite ideological, political, economic or religious differences, the delegates of 114 nations at the Conference were able to agree on an Action Plan and a Declaration of Principles based on the common realization that the Earth is a closed, ecological system and man continues to modify it only at his peril. In the articles, addresses and summaries which follow in this Special Report, we present a descriptive review of what happened at Stockholm. And we do so at some length, for Stock­ holm, we believe, represents a new plateau in man's awareness of his environment and of his relation to it. Contributors to the Special Report are R. Stephen Berry, professor of chemistry at the Uni­ versity of Chicago and member of our Editorial Board, Paul R. Ehrlich and Staff members Frances Gendlin and Sally Jacobsen who covered both the governmental and nongovernmental the Conference. activities at 11. A Call to

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1972 Bulletin of The Atomic Scientists
ISSN
1938-3282
eISSN
0096-3402
DOI
10.1080/00963402.1972.11457954
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Special Report What Happened at Stockholm The United Nations Conference on the Human Environment at Stockholm last June was an event of historic proportions. lt marked the beginning of a transition in the attitudes of most of the human race toward the future uses of the environment. Despite ideological, political, economic or religious differences, the delegates of 114 nations at the Conference were able to agree on an Action Plan and a Declaration of Principles based on the common realization that the Earth is a closed, ecological system and man continues to modify it only at his peril. In the articles, addresses and summaries which follow in this Special Report, we present a descriptive review of what happened at Stockholm. And we do so at some length, for Stock­ holm, we believe, represents a new plateau in man's awareness of his environment and of his relation to it. Contributors to the Special Report are R. Stephen Berry, professor of chemistry at the Uni­ versity of Chicago and member of our Editorial Board, Paul R. Ehrlich and Staff members Frances Gendlin and Sally Jacobsen who covered both the governmental and nongovernmental the Conference. activities at 11. A Call to

Journal

Bulletin of the Atomic ScientistsTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1972

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