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Illuminating an overlooked hunting stakeholder group: Nonhunters and their interest in hunting

Illuminating an overlooked hunting stakeholder group: Nonhunters and their interest in hunting Abstract While the traditional sport hunter wildlife management constituency appears to be declining, little is known about another group of hunting stakeholders—nonhunters who know hunters, participate in hunting‐related activities, have positive beliefs about hunting, and perceive benefits from hunting. This study explored New York State nonhunters’ experiences with and perceptions of hunting, using interview and mailed questionnaire data collection techniques. Many nonhunters know hunters and participate in hunting‐related activities. Roughly one‐third of nonhunters had positive beliefs about the utility of hunting as a wildlife management tool, and over 10% received benefits from hunting. These variables were significantly related to participation in hunting‐related activities with hunters. The size of the core nonhunter stakeholder population is estimated to be roughly equal to the active hunter population. These results suggest implications for wildlife managers as well as potential problems with traditional recreation‐based research treatments of hunting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Dimensions of Wildlife Taylor & Francis

Illuminating an overlooked hunting stakeholder group: Nonhunters and their interest in hunting

Illuminating an overlooked hunting stakeholder group: Nonhunters and their interest in hunting

Human Dimensions of Wildlife , Volume 1 (3): 13 – Sep 1, 1996

Abstract

Abstract While the traditional sport hunter wildlife management constituency appears to be declining, little is known about another group of hunting stakeholders—nonhunters who know hunters, participate in hunting‐related activities, have positive beliefs about hunting, and perceive benefits from hunting. This study explored New York State nonhunters’ experiences with and perceptions of hunting, using interview and mailed questionnaire data collection techniques. Many nonhunters know hunters and participate in hunting‐related activities. Roughly one‐third of nonhunters had positive beliefs about the utility of hunting as a wildlife management tool, and over 10% received benefits from hunting. These variables were significantly related to participation in hunting‐related activities with hunters. The size of the core nonhunter stakeholder population is estimated to be roughly equal to the active hunter population. These results suggest implications for wildlife managers as well as potential problems with traditional recreation‐based research treatments of hunting.

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References (15)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1533-158X
eISSN
1087-1209
DOI
10.1080/10871209609359068
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract While the traditional sport hunter wildlife management constituency appears to be declining, little is known about another group of hunting stakeholders—nonhunters who know hunters, participate in hunting‐related activities, have positive beliefs about hunting, and perceive benefits from hunting. This study explored New York State nonhunters’ experiences with and perceptions of hunting, using interview and mailed questionnaire data collection techniques. Many nonhunters know hunters and participate in hunting‐related activities. Roughly one‐third of nonhunters had positive beliefs about the utility of hunting as a wildlife management tool, and over 10% received benefits from hunting. These variables were significantly related to participation in hunting‐related activities with hunters. The size of the core nonhunter stakeholder population is estimated to be roughly equal to the active hunter population. These results suggest implications for wildlife managers as well as potential problems with traditional recreation‐based research treatments of hunting.

Journal

Human Dimensions of WildlifeTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1996

Keywords: hunting stakeholder; wildlife management; hunting‐related activities; beliefs; benefits

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