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India's Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing

India's Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing Harsh V. Pant India’s Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing In the last few years, India’s policy toward the Middle East has often been viewed through the prism of Indian—Iranian relations. The international community, and the West in particular, has been obsessed with New Delhi’s ties to Tehran, which are actually largely underdeveloped, while missing India’s much more substantive simultaneous engagement with Arab Gulf states and Israel. India’s relationship with the Middle East as a region is dramatically different than a generation ago. From 1947—1986, as at least one academic has argued, India was too ideological toward the region, paying insufficient attention to Indian national interests, particularly in its subdued ties with Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Today, however, India is developing its new Middle Eastern strategy around these three states, with New Delhi recently taking special care to nurture all these relationships and pursue its substantial regional interests. A Weak Litmus Test Ever since India and the United States began to transform their ties by changing the global nuclear order to accommodate India with the 2005 framework for the Indo—U.S. civilian nuclear agreement, Iran has become a litmus test that India has occasionally been asked to pass http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Washington Quarterly Taylor & Francis

India's Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing

The Washington Quarterly , Volume 34 (1): 14 – Feb 1, 2011

India's Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing

The Washington Quarterly , Volume 34 (1): 14 – Feb 1, 2011

Abstract

Harsh V. Pant India’s Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing In the last few years, India’s policy toward the Middle East has often been viewed through the prism of Indian—Iranian relations. The international community, and the West in particular, has been obsessed with New Delhi’s ties to Tehran, which are actually largely underdeveloped, while missing India’s much more substantive simultaneous engagement with Arab Gulf states and Israel. India’s relationship with the Middle East as a region is dramatically different than a generation ago. From 1947—1986, as at least one academic has argued, India was too ideological toward the region, paying insufficient attention to Indian national interests, particularly in its subdued ties with Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Today, however, India is developing its new Middle Eastern strategy around these three states, with New Delhi recently taking special care to nurture all these relationships and pursue its substantial regional interests. A Weak Litmus Test Ever since India and the United States began to transform their ties by changing the global nuclear order to accommodate India with the 2005 framework for the Indo—U.S. civilian nuclear agreement, Iran has become a litmus test that India has occasionally been asked to pass

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References (32)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Center for Strategic and International Studies
ISSN
1530-9177
eISSN
0163-660X
DOI
10.1080/0163660X.2011.534964
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Harsh V. Pant India’s Relations with Iran: Much Ado about Nothing In the last few years, India’s policy toward the Middle East has often been viewed through the prism of Indian—Iranian relations. The international community, and the West in particular, has been obsessed with New Delhi’s ties to Tehran, which are actually largely underdeveloped, while missing India’s much more substantive simultaneous engagement with Arab Gulf states and Israel. India’s relationship with the Middle East as a region is dramatically different than a generation ago. From 1947—1986, as at least one academic has argued, India was too ideological toward the region, paying insufficient attention to Indian national interests, particularly in its subdued ties with Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Today, however, India is developing its new Middle Eastern strategy around these three states, with New Delhi recently taking special care to nurture all these relationships and pursue its substantial regional interests. A Weak Litmus Test Ever since India and the United States began to transform their ties by changing the global nuclear order to accommodate India with the 2005 framework for the Indo—U.S. civilian nuclear agreement, Iran has become a litmus test that India has occasionally been asked to pass

Journal

The Washington QuarterlyTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 2011

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