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Into the Sun: Essays in Air Photography in Archaeology in Honour of Derrick Riley. Edited by D. Kennedy

Into the Sun: Essays in Air Photography in Archaeology in Honour of Derrick Riley. Edited by D.... 472 REVIEWS (perhaps intentionally not cited here) or the section on photography in Barker's Techniques of Archaeological Excavation, which are readable and entertaining. A chapter on the early days introduces others on basic principles and practice and equipment. The illustrions in the latter are of fearsome pieces of apparatus called monorail cameras, which may be in use at the Institute, but are not in evidence on any modem excavation, though they are doubtless still to be found in major laboratories. It would have been useful here to have more than three pages on so mm and 3 5 mm cameras, and their respective merits and problems. Flash techniques are usefully and fully dealt with, as also are the processing problems; but here again, the image is of a dessicated desert, where insects have to be excluded; the use of colour negative film, universally used in Britain, is relegated to the role of display photographs, and 'informal shots' (there are alas none of the latter in this book). Survey and site photography are described in rather exotic and archaic terms; stubs of walls at the bottom of a trench, photography before the sun comes-up, sections of baulks (do you remember http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archaeological Journal Taylor & Francis

Into the Sun: Essays in Air Photography in Archaeology in Honour of Derrick Riley. Edited by D. Kennedy

Archaeological Journal , Volume 147 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1990

Into the Sun: Essays in Air Photography in Archaeology in Honour of Derrick Riley. Edited by D. Kennedy

Archaeological Journal , Volume 147 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1990

Abstract

472 REVIEWS (perhaps intentionally not cited here) or the section on photography in Barker's Techniques of Archaeological Excavation, which are readable and entertaining. A chapter on the early days introduces others on basic principles and practice and equipment. The illustrions in the latter are of fearsome pieces of apparatus called monorail cameras, which may be in use at the Institute, but are not in evidence on any modem excavation, though they are doubtless still to be found in major laboratories. It would have been useful here to have more than three pages on so mm and 3 5 mm cameras, and their respective merits and problems. Flash techniques are usefully and fully dealt with, as also are the processing problems; but here again, the image is of a dessicated desert, where insects have to be excluded; the use of colour negative film, universally used in Britain, is relegated to the role of display photographs, and 'informal shots' (there are alas none of the latter in this book). Survey and site photography are described in rather exotic and archaic terms; stubs of walls at the bottom of a trench, photography before the sun comes-up, sections of baulks (do you remember

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1990 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2373-2288
eISSN
0066-5983
DOI
10.1080/00665983.1990.11077987
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

472 REVIEWS (perhaps intentionally not cited here) or the section on photography in Barker's Techniques of Archaeological Excavation, which are readable and entertaining. A chapter on the early days introduces others on basic principles and practice and equipment. The illustrions in the latter are of fearsome pieces of apparatus called monorail cameras, which may be in use at the Institute, but are not in evidence on any modem excavation, though they are doubtless still to be found in major laboratories. It would have been useful here to have more than three pages on so mm and 3 5 mm cameras, and their respective merits and problems. Flash techniques are usefully and fully dealt with, as also are the processing problems; but here again, the image is of a dessicated desert, where insects have to be excluded; the use of colour negative film, universally used in Britain, is relegated to the role of display photographs, and 'informal shots' (there are alas none of the latter in this book). Survey and site photography are described in rather exotic and archaic terms; stubs of walls at the bottom of a trench, photography before the sun comes-up, sections of baulks (do you remember

Journal

Archaeological JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.