Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction: tools for a critical heritage

Introduction: tools for a critical heritage InternatIonal Journal of HerItage StudIeS , 2018 Vol . 24, no . 7, 691– 693 https://doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2017.1413680 INTRODUCTION Elizabeth Kryder-Reid anthropology & Museum Studies, IuPuI, Indiana university, Indianapolis, In, uSa ARTICLE HISTORY received 17 o ctober 2017; a ccepted 10 november 2017 This collection engages with heritage studies at a dynamic moment in the development of the field. It builds on longstanding trends toward a more expansive understanding of heritage values and, consequently, a move toward more inclusive decision-making and resource management (Lipe 1984; Watkins 2000; De la Torre 2002, Walker and Marquis-Kyle 2004). Furthermore, the growing body of critical heritage studies not only interrogates the systems of power implicated in heritage practices, but demonstrates the potential of deploying tangible and intangible heritage to address historical and systemic inequalities as a social activist strategy (Janes and Conaty 2005; Smith 2006; Sandell 2007; Byrne 2008; Dwyer and Alderman 2008; Harrison 2010). While the change in heritage practices may seem disconcertingly slow, governmental agencies and non-governmental organisations are being increasingly held accountable to be more transparent and to recognise the multivalence of heritage for diverse communities and stakeholders. Scholars working in contexts such as archives, libraries, museums, historical societies, archaeological collections, monuments, and heritage http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Heritage Studies Taylor & Francis

Introduction: tools for a critical heritage

Introduction: tools for a critical heritage

International Journal of Heritage Studies , Volume 24 (7): 3 – Aug 9, 2018

Abstract

InternatIonal Journal of HerItage StudIeS , 2018 Vol . 24, no . 7, 691– 693 https://doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2017.1413680 INTRODUCTION Elizabeth Kryder-Reid anthropology & Museum Studies, IuPuI, Indiana university, Indianapolis, In, uSa ARTICLE HISTORY received 17 o ctober 2017; a ccepted 10 november 2017 This collection engages with heritage studies at a dynamic moment in the development of the field. It builds on longstanding trends toward a more expansive understanding of heritage values and, consequently, a move toward more inclusive decision-making and resource management (Lipe 1984; Watkins 2000; De la Torre 2002, Walker and Marquis-Kyle 2004). Furthermore, the growing body of critical heritage studies not only interrogates the systems of power implicated in heritage practices, but demonstrates the potential of deploying tangible and intangible heritage to address historical and systemic inequalities as a social activist strategy (Janes and Conaty 2005; Smith 2006; Sandell 2007; Byrne 2008; Dwyer and Alderman 2008; Harrison 2010). While the change in heritage practices may seem disconcertingly slow, governmental agencies and non-governmental organisations are being increasingly held accountable to be more transparent and to recognise the multivalence of heritage for diverse communities and stakeholders. Scholars working in contexts such as archives, libraries, museums, historical societies, archaeological collections, monuments, and heritage

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/introduction-tools-for-a-critical-heritage-1Klr0F00oG

References (14)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Elizabeth Kryder-Reid. Published with licence by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1470-3610
eISSN
1352-7258
DOI
10.1080/13527258.2017.1413680
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

InternatIonal Journal of HerItage StudIeS , 2018 Vol . 24, no . 7, 691– 693 https://doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2017.1413680 INTRODUCTION Elizabeth Kryder-Reid anthropology & Museum Studies, IuPuI, Indiana university, Indianapolis, In, uSa ARTICLE HISTORY received 17 o ctober 2017; a ccepted 10 november 2017 This collection engages with heritage studies at a dynamic moment in the development of the field. It builds on longstanding trends toward a more expansive understanding of heritage values and, consequently, a move toward more inclusive decision-making and resource management (Lipe 1984; Watkins 2000; De la Torre 2002, Walker and Marquis-Kyle 2004). Furthermore, the growing body of critical heritage studies not only interrogates the systems of power implicated in heritage practices, but demonstrates the potential of deploying tangible and intangible heritage to address historical and systemic inequalities as a social activist strategy (Janes and Conaty 2005; Smith 2006; Sandell 2007; Byrne 2008; Dwyer and Alderman 2008; Harrison 2010). While the change in heritage practices may seem disconcertingly slow, governmental agencies and non-governmental organisations are being increasingly held accountable to be more transparent and to recognise the multivalence of heritage for diverse communities and stakeholders. Scholars working in contexts such as archives, libraries, museums, historical societies, archaeological collections, monuments, and heritage

Journal

International Journal of Heritage StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 9, 2018

There are no references for this article.