Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

It’s All about Timing: Captive Targeting through Mobile Ads

It’s All about Timing: Captive Targeting through Mobile Ads Abstract How would consumers respond to mobile ads in spatially and temporally bounded captive environments? We theorize that consumers who are forced to wait are likely to perceive an abundance of time and ultimately become more responsive to mobile ads. To test our theory, we conducted three studies following a multimethod approach. In Study 1, a large-scale field study (n = 66,473), we found a relationship between captivity and receptiveness to mobile ads in transit. In Study 2, a lab experiment, we extended our findings by revealing that time perception mediated the relationship between captivity and intention to click on mobile ads. Last, in Study 3, we tested boredom and individual propensities to use time efficiently as underlying mediating and moderating conditions for captivity’s effect. Overall, the results have implications for advertising practitioners and researchers examining context-based mobile targeting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Advertising Taylor & Francis

It’s All about Timing: Captive Targeting through Mobile Ads

Journal of Advertising , Volume OnlineFirst: 20 – May 21, 2023
20 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/it-s-all-about-timing-captive-targeting-through-mobile-ads-C0NT70irE0

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright © 2023, American Academy of Advertising
ISSN
1557-7805
eISSN
0091-3367
DOI
10.1080/00913367.2023.2212010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract How would consumers respond to mobile ads in spatially and temporally bounded captive environments? We theorize that consumers who are forced to wait are likely to perceive an abundance of time and ultimately become more responsive to mobile ads. To test our theory, we conducted three studies following a multimethod approach. In Study 1, a large-scale field study (n = 66,473), we found a relationship between captivity and receptiveness to mobile ads in transit. In Study 2, a lab experiment, we extended our findings by revealing that time perception mediated the relationship between captivity and intention to click on mobile ads. Last, in Study 3, we tested boredom and individual propensities to use time efficiently as underlying mediating and moderating conditions for captivity’s effect. Overall, the results have implications for advertising practitioners and researchers examining context-based mobile targeting.

Journal

Journal of AdvertisingTaylor & Francis

Published: May 21, 2023

References